News

BMA to close Norwich Park mine

UP TO 1400 workers will face uncertainty after resources giant BMA announced it would shut its Norwich Park mine.

Of those, 490 are permanent workers the company will try to redeploy to its other operations, its Saraji mine in particular.

The coking coal operation is partly owned by BHP Billiton.

A BHP spokesman said some staff would be given voluntary redundancies at the discretion of the company, but many may be able to find work elsewhere.

"The first obligation is to our direct employees," he said.

"Every effort will be made to redeploy them."

In a statement released just after 2pm, BHP explains that Norwich Park "has been losing money for several months" as it was hit by falling production, rising costs and lower coal prices.

It would "cease production indefinitely".

The decision was made after a seven week review into the project.

BMA asset president Stephen Dumble said it was not made lightly, but there was no escaping that Norwich park "is not currently viable".

"While recent industrial action has had an impact on production, the mine has been unprofitable for some months," Mr Dumble said.

"As a result, we have had to take urgent steps to both stop the losses and find the best way to secure the operation's longer term future.

"Importantly, this decision on Norwich Park Mine is not reflective of the broader quality of our world-class Queensland coal operations."

In the statement, Mr Dumble said the mine would remain closed until a viable solution was found.

"We understand that this decision will have a significant impact on our employees, their families and the Dysart community and we are committed to supporting them during this period," he said.

The mine produced about 2.11 million tonnes of coking coal in the 2011 calendar year, down from 3.74 million tonnes the year before.

Comment is now being sought from the mine workers union.

Topics:  bhp billiton mitsubishi alliance, norwich park mine




Join the Community.

Get your local news, your way.

Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

Jakki's code words keep her kids safe from predators

Jakki King with her three children Photo: Contributed

'They were quite surprised to hear it was happening here'

GALLERY: Rocky, what's your beef?

Edwin Christensen and Fabrizio Piasco from Tall Poppy Catering at the Wholly Cow What's Your Beef event. Photo Michelle Gately / Morning Bulletin

Hundreds of people get a taste for the region's beef at Wholly Cow

Rocky region demands a Fair Go for health services

Smoking, drinking, bad diets are killing us faster than in Brisbane

Latest deals and offers

Wholly Cow month

Rockhampton Regional Council's promotions manager Sarah Reeves at the Wholly Cow What's Your Beef event. Photo Michelle Gately / Morning Bulletin

Rockhampton Regional Council's promotions manager Sarah Reeves speaks about the...

What's Your Beef?

Bianca and Winston Lee at the Wholly Cow What's Your Beef event. Photo Michelle Gately / Morning Bulletin

Bianca Lee was one of hundreds to sample the region's best beef dishes at What's...

Berserker siege

Siege situation at Berserker. Photo Allan Reinikka / The Morning Bulletin

Berserker siege

Real estate agent says new developments push area forward

ON THE UPSIDE: Shae O’Reilly says the Capricorn Coast and the wider region has plenty of projects going on while we wait for an outcome on Great Keppel Island.

"sentiment can’t hang its hat on one setback for one project"

Real estate reveals Rocky's rising suburbs

Pat O'Driscoll Real Estate sales consultant Talitha Dodson Photo: Contributed

Talitha Dodson says it’s not all doom and gloom

Demand for acreage lots pushes up property prices

Property values in Cooroy have increased 25%

Property values jump in Cooroy and Peachester.