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New apartments sprinkle Salt of development on Cap Coast

An artist's impression of the inside of one of the Salt apartments.
An artist's impression of the inside of one of the Salt apartments. Amy Marshall

AS YEPPOON wriggles impatiently for an answer on a proposal to redevelop Great Keppel Island, many developers have decided they can't wait any longer.

No doubt banking on the hope a visit from Australia's Environment Minister means the revitalisation plan may go ahead, yet another developer is spruiking a major accommodation project.

With views to paradise and central location, the $28million Salt development is designed to refresh Yeppoon's main beachfront.

Developers Andrew Beaumont, Wayne Riddell and Brian Griffin plan to build 50 apartments, ranging from one bedroom to a three-bedroom penthouse.

O'Reilly's Real Estate principal Ross O'Reilly said the project came on the back of the release of the $35 million Oshen apartment project and the start of operations at XXXX Island.

"That's a hugely positive thing in terms of cementing our position as one of Australia's prime tourist destinations and will hopefully push developer Tower Holidays to continue the momentum with the Great Keppel Island redevelopment once it is approved," Mr O'Reilly said.

But Tower Holding's Great Keppel Island resort project still has to pass a number of hurdles.

Development has been a controversial topic on the Capricorn Coast, with some adamant the region needs an economic boost and other keen to preserve a sleepy fishing village culture and limit impacts on the natural environment.

The Great Keppel Island project is being assessed under national environment law because of its potential impacts on nationally threatened species, World and National heritage places, Commonwealth marine areas and the Great Barrier Reef.

The draft Environmental Impact Statement was open for public comment until October 22 this year.

Federal Environment Minister Tony Burke said it was now up to the developers to address concerns raised through public consultation and submit a final environmental impact statement to the department.

Once the statement was received, the Minister would have 40 business days to make a decision on whether or not the project could go ahead under national environmental law.

Topics:  capricorn, salt, yeppoon




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