Adopted Ethiopian son Motu pictured with mum, Kath, have had plans to adopt another child put on hold thanks to a Government suspension.
Adopted Ethiopian son Motu pictured with mum, Kath, have had plans to adopt another child put on hold thanks to a Government suspension.

Kath Zischke hopes of more family

A FOUR-year wait to extend their multi-cultural family just got even longer for Kath and Wal Zischke.

Three years ago they were blessed with little Motu, who was adopted from Ethiopia.

Since then the Central Queensland couple has wanted to adopt another child from the same country, but last month the Ethiopian Australian Intercountry Adoption Program was suspended pending a comprehensive review.

But Mrs Zischke is prepared to fight for her future family.

Mrs Zischke, 33, is not able to have children of her own, so she and Wal made an early decision to adopt rather than try their luck at various fertility treatments.

“We haven’t explored all avenues of fertility, but didn’t want to spend 20 years doing that, I wanted to start a family quicker,” she said.

“Biology doesn’t matter to us.”

Mrs Zischke, who lives on a property at Jambin, near Biloela, said the suspension has caused her much frustration.

“Our files have not left – it’s already been sitting on a desk for 2½ years,” she said.

“It won’t leave for another two years based on basic allocation rates, but this will make it longer.”

Mr and Mrs Zischke have already been pre-approved for a child of either gender under three years.

They picked up little Motu when he was six months old from Ethiopia.

When they collected him he was a very malnourished baby and doctors had to fight to keep him alive.

But now Motu is a healthy three-year-old boy who is readily accepted into the community.

Mr and Mrs Zischke have been invited to put a submission to the Attorney-General outlining their case for a second child from the same country. It is December 7 – Motu’s fourth birthday.

Attorney-General Robert McClelland suspended the program because of concerns that Australia could no longer conduct intercountry adoptions in Ethiopia in a manner consistent with its obligations under the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in respect of Intercountry Adoption.

“We might have to end up changing programs and that’s why we’re fighting,” Mrs Zischke said.

“We have already adapted our life around that culture.”

Mrs Zischke said she fell in love with Ethiopia right from the start, and when they visited to collect Motu it only intensified their affection for the country.

The review of the program should be finalised by the end of the year. Mrs Zischke said he hoped to gain support and raise community awareness about how the government’s decision was affecting many people.



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