Algae bloom on Capricorn Coast shows marine life healthy

THE first blooms of blue green algae are beginning to arrive on beaches along the Capricorn Coast.

Trichodesmium, the blue green algae, which occurs naturally each year, is an important part of our marine ecosystem.

Livingstone Shire Council is reminding residents that while this matter may emit an offensive smell and may colour sea water, it is harmless to humans.

Cr Adam Belot, who holds the portfolio for water, waste management and the environment, said the blue green algae is in the initial stages of blooming.

"The blue green algae makes an appearance every year when conditions are right," Cr Belot said.

"The blooms are appearing right on cue and it is likely that residents and visitors will notice trichodesmium deposits on our beaches."

"Trichodesmium is an important process in the health of our waters and an indication of our healthy marine ecosystem.

A side effect of the trichodesmium blooms is a fishy smell which can be strongest when deposits are at their peak."

While the non-toxic algae is generally harmless to people, some who have sensitive skin may experience some minor irritation.

"All beach and water activity is safe during this natural re-generating process," Cr Belot said.

"If you do enter the water it's advised to simply rinse off after your activity in one of the many available beach showers."

For more information, call council's customer service team on 49135000 or visit livingstone.qld.gov.au



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