Business is booming . . . no bull

WHAT began as a humble fibreglass repair shop has turned into a lucrative hot rod design business for owners Claire Morrison and Wade Dobbs.

The couple opened their Custom Fibreglass shop in Rockhampton about five years ago and have been amazed at how the business has evolved.

Repairing fibreglass on boats and vehicles generated most of the revenue in the beginning.

But that soon changed, once word got out about Mr Dobbs' expertise in shaping hot rod frames.

"This is an ideal job for him (Mr Dobbs) because he loves working with fibreglass and hot rods,'' Ms Morrison said. "It is very satisfying work for him.''

The business now generates about 50% of its revenue from moulding hot rod shells.

"You have no idea how big business the hot rod industry is until you get into it,'' she said.

"We have sold hot rods to people all over Australia.''

Building a hot rod body, however, is a long, involved process. It usually takes about three weeks.

First a mould is fitted and designed, then fibreglass material is placed in the mould, and finally the fibreglass is heated with a resin. This shapes and hardens the raw fibreglass.

"We are one of the only shops that makes the 1934 Chevy bodies,'' she said.



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