Dive-bombing bird scratches bike and helmet

SEVEN-year-old Jye Sarcich has had a close encounter of a bird kind.

While riding his birthday bike through the streets of Emu Park a few weeks ago, he never expected to be held up by a swooping magpie.

"I was walking with my mum and younger brother when the bird came down and scratched my new BMX bike and helmet,'' he said.

"It just flew down from the tree and kept swooping at me.''

Jye's mother Helen said she would have gone to help her son if it was not for her fear of birds.

"I was a little concerned about my other son, Liam, who wanted to go out and catch the bird.

"It was hilarious, like one of those Funniest Home Video moments, but I did feel sorry for Jye.''

Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) senior ranger Tim Farry said people needed to take extra care as the magpie season swooped into Central Queensland.

He said the magpie breeding season occurred from July to December, with the peak from late August to October.

"It is important to remember that not all magpies swoop, and they only do so while chicks are in the nest to drive away potential threats,'' he said.

"The male magpie is responsible for most swoops and we know that this swooping is almost entirely limited to the magpie 'defence zone' or the area around the nest.''

TKO Pest Control technician Lucas Christian said some of the magpie hot spots in Rockhampton last year included Frenchville State School, Allenstown and Wandal.

"Anywhere with large trees about is where magpies like to nest,'' he said.

Mr Farry asked if there were any problem magpie areas to contact Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) on 4936?0511.



Aboriginal artist, political activist wins $50K art award

Aboriginal artist, political activist wins $50K art award

The Gold Award is one of the richest art prizes in Australia

CQ house destroyed in 'suspicious' fire

CQ house destroyed in 'suspicious' fire

Two police officers suffered smoke inhalation

SCAM: Drought-hit farmers targeted by fake hunters

SCAM: Drought-hit farmers targeted by fake hunters

Police say farmers have enough to worry about with drought

Local Partners