WHILE most teenage girls spend their adolescence with their friends, at the beach and studying for school, Kirra Wyatt was in and out of hospital battling for her life.

Once told by doctors she had a five per cent chance of survival, 17-year-old Kirra has made a triumphant comeback with a message for others battling even the worst odds.

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"I've been given another chance and I'm going to take advantage of that," she said.

"I want everyone who's struggling to know it's so important to keep a positive outlook and things do get better."

After visiting a GP for growing pains and a swollen knee, a then 14-year-old Kirra was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in her right leg - a rare form of bone cancer.

She was one of just 223 Australians diagnosed with primary bone cancer in 2014.

 

Kirra Wyatt was diagnosed with a rare bone cancer four years ago.
Kirra Wyatt was diagnosed with a rare bone cancer four years ago. Contributed

"When I found out, I kind of pretended it wasn't happening and wore a wig, put make up on - I was in denial," she said.

"There was one point where I said it's okay if I die because there's no life left."

Chemotherapy was required and it was the affects of the treatment that took its greatest toll on Kirra.

"They said to me there was a 70 per cent chance of my hair falling out and of course, I hoped I was a part of the 30 per cent," Kirra said.

"But when it started falling out in clumps, I shaved it off.

"I think that was one of the only times I cried really hard."

As doctors worked to save Kirra, surgery was needed to replace her femur bone with a titanium rod.

After a year of treatment, she was finally declared cancer free.

But Kirra's fight wasn't over yet - she would relapse three more times.

In February 2016, the cancer returned in her right leg forcing her to undergo surgery a second time to replace the titanium rod.

 

Kirra Wyatt from Point Vernon - recovered from bone cancer four years ago.
Kirra Wyatt from Point Vernon - recovered from bone cancer four years ago. Alistair Brightman

Months later in June 2016, a lesion was found on her right lung, which was removed but reappeared again in October last year.

It was during these dark days Kirra felt she didn't have the strength to continue.

But the support from her parents, Larissa and Wayne and siblings Daniel, 15, and Summer Lea, 4, kept her going.

Larissa said her daughter showed enormous amounts of strength in the hardest of times.

"Seeing Kirra go through all of that was heartbreaking," she said.

"She was so strong, she didn't whinge and she didn't cry - we were so proud of her."

Against all odds, through the harshest of obstacles, Kirra is now back to feeling like a normal teenager.

Although she has less energy than she did four years ago, she is determined to never let a day go to waste.

"I exercise, I eat clean and I never take anything for granted because I know how quickly it can be taken away," Kirra said.



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