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Police officers forced to take leave

BILL Feldman has used a popular children's counting rhyme to describe the way in which police officers' annual leave is being allocated now the G20 Summit is over.

Writing in the latest Police Journal, the Queensland Police Union Central Region representative said leave was restricted in the lead-up to the G20, with a leave embargo in place from September to November.

He said officers-in-charge were now being told to get all their police staff under the 228-hour threshold before June 30, 2015.

"And now, like mustered cattle, we are about to be pushed through the crush," Mr Feldman wrote.

"We may apparently be rostered on recreation leave without our input, or be made to pick dates we don't want, or be somehow forced to take recreation leave just to get our hours down.

"Some are targeted like a dartboard and told to throw the dart to see when their leave is, or leave is taken just like the old eenie, meenie, miny, moe game. The OIC and roster clerk just reach out and catch the Connie by the toe, if he squeals, off on leave he goes - eenie, meenie, miny, moe."

But a police spokesman said officers were notified of a change in restrictions which were approved by the Commissioner on December 8.

"The standard annual leave requirement for police officers is to ensure recreation leave balances do not exceed 228 hours as at June 30 each year or 250.8 hours for officers in designated remote areas," he said.

"Due to the restrictions that were placed on officers to comply with the G20 leave embargo, the Commissioner approved the annual leave balance as at June 30, 2015 to increase to 266 hours for all officers and 288.8 hours for remote area officers."

Mr Feldman also criticised the accommodation in which some police officers were housed during the G20, saying it was nowhere near the three-star accommodation that was promised.

"I am thinking of the poor old QPS negotiators who did it tougher than the rest of us, sweating it out in the academy dormitories: no air-conditioning, no personal TV (only lounge facilities), communal shower and toilet facilities (unisex), single bed dormitory accommodation (no queen or king size beds), and with only the local wildlife, the rats, for company."

Topics:  g20 g20 summit police union



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