Gardening guru Neil Fisher in the rose garden at the Alpha Town Hall. The roses were planted in April this year and are all coming into full bloom now.
Gardening guru Neil Fisher in the rose garden at the Alpha Town Hall. The roses were planted in April this year and are all coming into full bloom now.

Bloomin’ beauties: Why roses grow so well in CQ

ROSES have thrived in Central Queensland for more than a century and are putting on a stunning display right now, according to gardening guru Neil Fisher.

The region's weather is a majority contributor to their ongoing prosperity, with the warmer winters encouraging some of the first blooms of spring.

Many new hybrids also allow roses to flower well past the traditional spring and autumn flowering season.

Mr Fisher said his favourite rose was the Cecile Brunner, which hails from France and has been grown in CQ for more than 100 years.

 

Neil Fisher's favourite rose is the Cecile Brunner, which forms a large rambling shrub with very few thorns.
Neil Fisher's favourite rose is the Cecile Brunner, which forms a large rambling shrub with very few thorns.

 

"It forms a large rambling shrub with very few thorns. It is highlighted by large clusters of small, sweet, if not slightly spicy perfumed perfectly shaped pink blooms.

"First bred in France in 1881, the Cecile Brunner Rose found its way to Mount Morgan not long afterwards and descendants of these roses can still be found in the town."

Mr Fisher offers his tips for growing roses here.

New rose gardens

• When planting a new rose into a garden bed, it should have been prepared at least a fortnight beforehand and allowed to settle.

• Make a hole about 300mm (or one foot) deep and the same in diameter. Form a mound in the bottom of the hole to a level that the graft or bud union is about 25mm above the soil level.

• Place the soil back around the root ball and water in, as this will eliminate air pockets.

 

A perfect example of one of the brilliant roses in full bloom in Rockhampton. Photo: Pam McKay.
A perfect example of one of the brilliant roses in full bloom in Rockhampton. Photo: Pam McKay.

 

• Roses do not like having their feet waterlogged, and this is often the cause of many rose failures.

• Fertilising of freshly planted roses is widely discouraged by many specialist growers but I have always found that using a small quantity of slow-release Osmocote has worked quite successfully.

• However, if stronger amounts of fertiliser are used when planting, it may force new growth but damage the root system, which is the most important part of the plant at this stage.

 

 

Roses are in full bloom in Rockhampton. Photo: Pam McKay
Roses are in full bloom in Rockhampton. Photo: Pam McKay

Positioning new roses

• When positioning new roses in the garden, I would always recommend a distance of one metre or three feet apart for hybrid tea roses, and half to three quarters of a metre for floribunda roses, as this will give a more colourful display.

• In cases where the rose is known to have a spreading form rather than a tall growing habit, remember that they will need a slightly larger space between them.

• The overall effect of your rose garden is more attractive if they are grouped together according to height, with the taller ones placed at the back of the bed. This also applies to climbers, which need three or four metres space between them.

• Position the medium to small growing roses in the middle of the bed, with the miniature roses around the border of the garden, about 30cm apart.

Email your rose photos with variety names to pam.mckay@news.com.au



UPDATE: Burning bra sends fire crews to South Rocky home

Premium Content UPDATE: Burning bra sends fire crews to South Rocky home

Multiple fire crews were dispatched to the scene earlier this afternoon.

WATCH: North Rocky house fire declared a crime scene

Premium Content WATCH: North Rocky house fire declared a crime scene

Forensic investigators have descended on a the property after a blaze gutted part...

New store to open in old Harris Scarfe site at Stockland

Premium Content New store to open in old Harris Scarfe site at Stockland

Construction has been going on at the site behind closed walls for some weeks.