Launching the Clean-Up Dysart program are (back, from left): Gerry Condon, Kelly O’Leary, Larnie Roberts, Leah Fay, Elisa Crooks, Richard O’Brien, Scott Whybird, Andrew Wilson, Peter Sharpe; (middle) Shaun Radford, Thomas Lloyd, Nikki Gifford, Laura Sutton, Hope Woods, Renee Maunder; (front) Tracey Cuttriss-Smith, Jordan Maceachern, Lachlan MacDonald-Cambden, Marcus MacDonald-Cambden and Brodie Hanton.
Launching the Clean-Up Dysart program are (back, from left): Gerry Condon, Kelly O’Leary, Larnie Roberts, Leah Fay, Elisa Crooks, Richard O’Brien, Scott Whybird, Andrew Wilson, Peter Sharpe; (middle) Shaun Radford, Thomas Lloyd, Nikki Gifford, Laura Sutton, Hope Woods, Renee Maunder; (front) Tracey Cuttriss-Smith, Jordan Maceachern, Lachlan MacDonald-Cambden, Marcus MacDonald-Cambden and Brodie Hanton. Supplied

BMA and school clean up Dysart

BMA and Dysart State High School have taken the meaning of “rubbish duty” to a new level, launching the Clean-Up Dysart program to clean up litter in the Central Queensland town.

Launched in November, the program involves a fortnightly clean-up and will continue for six months, after which the school and BMA will review and evaluate its effectiveness and look at bringing in additional partners to ensure its longevity.

Traditionally the relationship between BMA and Dysart State High School has been focused on education. However, Gus Gomes, general manager of BMA’s Norwich Park Mine, and Peter Sharpe, general manager of BMA’s Saraji Mine, along with school principal Scott Whybird, believed it was time to do something about the state of Dysart’s streets and parks.

“It’s encouraging to see the successful relationship between the mines and the local high school diversify and focus on an issue that has become so important for today’s society and the environment,” Mr Sharpe said.

At the first clean-up on November 18 more than 60kg of rubbish was picked up in an hour.

More than 20 people took part, including BMA employees and students and teachers from Dysart State High School.

Norwich Park’s Gus Gomes said the state of Dysart was the responsibility of every resident of the town.

“It’s time that we became proactive and got involved to overcome the problem, both by prevention and cleaning up rubbish,” he said.



CQ league legend has Qld women primed for Origin

premium_icon CQ league legend has Qld women primed for Origin

Jason Hetherington: 'The girls are all excited and in good spirits'

Madison beats rare illness and wins Qld exam top honour

premium_icon Madison beats rare illness and wins Qld exam top honour

RGS student defies the odds after being diagnosed with rare disease

Another hat thrown in the Pinefest Ambassador Quest ring

premium_icon Another hat thrown in the Pinefest Ambassador Quest ring

He is passionate about medical cures and tourism