'He didn’t want to die... ice made him feel that way'

A BUNDABERG mother didn't know much about drugs in Bundaberg before her son became an ice addict, then she witnessed the unimaginable, him hanging from a street pole.

The woman, who wished to remain anonymous, said her 20-year-old son started using the drug and living on the streets about five years ago after his psychotic rages were too much for her family to handle.

She recalled times where she was desperate for help and couldn't find it in the community.

"It's such a scary thing, they aren't themselves," she said.

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"They do things like cutting their arms - he tried to kill himself and another time he stabbed himself in the stomach.

"One time the police came out and he acted all nice as pie and they said they couldn't do anything and left."

She said there was a fine line with what police and ambulance could do when they found someone on ice.

"Half an hour later he tried to kill himself, he had the strength to climb a street pole, slide out along it and hang himself," she said.

"He was hanging from the street light out the front of my house by his belt around his neck."

The mother-of-four said he fell out of the noose and was then taken to hospital by ambulance where it took several security guards to control him.

"They were trying to hold him, he was screaming with rage that he would take them all on," she said.

"They had to sit on him and give him two injections to control and comatose him.

"He was then taken to the mental health unit and the next day when I saw him it was like I had my normal boy back.

"He didn't want to die, never did, but under the ice it made him feel that way."

She said the strength which was shown by her son when he was on ice was unbelievable and scary to everyone around him.

"I ended up getting an AVO (apprehended violence order) against him and couldn't have him at my place," she said.

"He would break things, put holes in walls and rip doors off their hinges with his strength.

"His rage would build and the ups were up and the downs were very down.

"One minute he would be on ice talking about how he wanted to get a great job and the next it would be F*** off I don't want anything.

"It's hard to help them.

"It's a cycle, the ice would make him hallucinate, the rage keeps building and they get ideas in their head and with all the rage they go psychotic."

The 41-year-old said her son was her third oldest and she didn't know why he turned to ice.

"I know it's easy enough to get hold of here in Bundy but I don't understand why the kids turn to it," she said.

"They wouldn't drink a bottle of Drain'o from under the kitchen sink so I don't understand."

Fortunately she said her son had a turning point in his life and earlier this year found out he was going to be a father.

"When my son was on ice he thought he had no self-worth," she said.

"Now his girlfriend is pregnant and he has been off ice for four months.

"His drive to stay clean is for his baby.

"He always wanted to be a father and now he has a job and wants to stay clean."

She said she had been through dark times with her son before the turning point and thought Bundaberg would benefit from something like a rehab centre for ice addicts.

"He has gone from being skinny, with black under his eyes and drawn out to eating and the money now goes to food instead of drugs," she said.



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