Barcaldine producer, Ben Chandler, picked up 126 eight to nine-month-old Santa Gertrudis and Santa Droughtmaster heifers from Australian Livestock Company's Terrick Terrick Station, Blackall, for $1500 per head, during the AAM and RLX Replacement Heifer Sale.
Barcaldine producer, Ben Chandler, picked up 126 eight to nine-month-old Santa Gertrudis and Santa Droughtmaster heifers from Australian Livestock Company's Terrick Terrick Station, Blackall, for $1500 per head, during the AAM and RLX Replacement Heifer Sale.

‘Buoyant moods’ felt at high profile Beef 21’ auctions

Confidence was high in the cattle market at the big-ticket sales during Beef Australia 2021 with high averages reached.

A number of high-profile auctions were held including the Nutrien Livestock Commercial Cattle Competition Sale, and the AAM and RLX Replacement Heifer Sale.

Regional Livestock Exchange (RLX) general manager Operations, Cye Travers, said incredible demand for both finished and restocker cattle was evident at the auctions.

The Nutrien event grossed $3.64 million across 1566 lots of grain and grassfed lines, and boasted averages well over $2200/head for all categories.

“The current demand for finished cattle, and for cattle suited to the live export market, is very strong and that was mirrored in the prices we had at the sale,” Mr Travers said.

“I also believe the results were reflective of the buoyant mood among producers which is driving buyer confidence in the market.”

The 898 grainfed cattle on offer had an average weight of 599kg, sold for an average of 400c/kg and returned $2397/head.

The 668 grassfed cattle presented found their average at 589kg, and made an average of 388c/kg to achieve $2252/head.

Mr Travers congratulated the Quinn family, Essex Grazing Company, for taking out the Grand Champion Exhibit, and commended all producers who showcased their stock.

“The competition was a great opportunity for producers to not only gain industry feedback, but to also gain industry acknowledgment for the strategies they have implemented within their own programs and management,” he said.

AAM and RLX support rescue services at inaugural heifer sale

The inaugural AAM and RLX Replacement Heifer Sale, hosted through StockLive, made its debut with an added goal of supporting much-valued rescue services across Australia.

The national online-only sale attracted a variety of breeds from key production areas throughout Queensland and NSW, and as far north as Katherine in the Northern Territory.

“Across our saleyards in 2021 the sky has been the limit for quality female cattle which have good genetics. This sale was no different and had extremely strong results,” Mr Travers said.

“Not only did the online sale give people the opportunity to buy and sell from multiple locations around the country, it also allowed producers to participate in Beef Australia even though they weren’t able to attend in person.”

The sale’s top pen was a Shorthorn offering from Norland Pastoral Company, Weebollabolla, Moree, which reached $2125/head and had an average weight of 488kg across the 20 head.

The sale received more than 90 bids for the 15 lots on offer.

Looking ahead, Mr Travers said he did not foresee the fierce demand for female cattle dissipating in the near future.

“The herd rebuilding effort will take a long time,” he said.

“I believe we will need five to six years of good seasons before the industry can be in a position where it has recovered.

“If you look at NSW alone, the state’s herd numbers are at their lowest levels since 1960.

“Given the long-term process of producers replenishing their stock numbers, I don’t predict prices to slump anytime soon, unless we see some pretty severe seasonal impacts.”

The success of the sale and positive feedback received has cemented the auction’s place as a mainstay for AAM and RLXs’ Beef Australia proceedings.

All entry fees paid by producers to enter the special sale were donated directly to emergency service providers across three states. In total, $24,000 was raised, including a $5000 donation from AACo.

Mr Travers said AAM and RLX were honoured to support the Royal Flying Doctor Service, Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service and the RACQ Capricorn Helicopter Rescue Service, each of which provides vital support to rural and remote Australians needing urgent medical care.

“These are services our community cannot do without,” he said.

K1T Working Dogs' Glenroy Nigel was bought for $8500 by Glen Innes buyer, Will Cameron, through StockLive during the Ray White Livestock Rockhampton Open Dog Trial and Working Dog Sale.
K1T Working Dogs' Glenroy Nigel was bought for $8500 by Glen Innes buyer, Will Cameron, through StockLive during the Ray White Livestock Rockhampton Open Dog Trial and Working Dog Sale.

Good prices flow-on the working dogs

Also during the busy week of sales, the positive sentiment in the beef industry flowed on to other segments, including at the Ray White Livestock Rockhampton Open Dog Trial and Working Dog Sale.

Held at CQLX’s Austadium, the sale was topped by a three-year-old Collie Kelpie cross called Day’s Creek Bongo for a record price of $10,000.

The sale had 100 per cent clearance rate and boasted an average of $5537.

Competition through StockLive meant buyers, including some from as far west as Western Australia, were able to participate in the sale which also proved popular with the Beef Australia crowds.

The top-selling dog purchased through StockLive was Glenroy Nigel which reached $8500. The K1T Working Dogs’ chocolate and white Border Collie cross was bought by Glen Innes buyer, Will Cameron.

“The dog sale was great and we had more than 500 people in the crowd watching on,” Mr Travers said.

“This isn’t a new trend to see buoyancy in the cattle market flow into the dog and stock horse industries. We have seen record pricing levels this year at numerous horse and dog sales.”

RLX regional operations manager, Gavin Tickle, said each sale hosted at CQLX provided an opportunity for RLX to showcase the full scope of services available at the selling centre.

“Our support of Beef Australia 2021 was a wonderful opportunity for people working in the industry to see the improvements we have made to the CQLX facility,” Mr Tickle said.

“We believe we have the best selling facility in Australia, but we are more than just a saleyard as we offer dipping and feeding, and our stadium means we can host rural sporting events, like the dog trial and sale in front of large crowds.”



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