Owner Kerry Cressy, pictured with Steve Hams, of Gracemere, cradles Nyah after she was rescued from a council trap.
Owner Kerry Cressy, pictured with Steve Hams, of Gracemere, cradles Nyah after she was rescued from a council trap. Sharyn O'Neill

Cat owner calls for ban on traps

UP TO 10 people a week borrow cat traps from Rockhampton Regional Council.

Kerry Cressy wants them banned.

Cradling her pet Nyah, which she says was hurt and traumatised when it was caught in a trap in a neighbouring yard, Kerry says the traps are barbaric and in breach of the Animal Welfare Act.

“The council has to take more responsibility to ensure these ‘Daniel Boone neighbours’ are held accountable for the welfare of the animals they trap,” Ms Cressy said.

The Springsure nurse has been living with a friend in Gracemere while she recuperates from surgery and brought her two cats with her.

“We lock them up at night so they don’t get into mischief, but they go out during the day,” she said, adding that in the neighbourhood there were cats everywhere.

“You can’t keep a cat in a yard, it’s just impossible,” she said.

She alleges that a neighbour set a trap and baited it with food and then left his property for at least 12 hours.

“Nyah had been in the trap at least four hours without water.

"She had an injured paw and a cut on her ear from trying to escape the cage and if the children had not heard her she would have been in the cage until nine at night when the neighbour returned,” she said.

Ms Cressy believes the council has a duty of care to ensure no animal trapped in one of its cages is harmed.

“At the very least it should insist that people using the traps erect signs to warn owners of the risk.”

A council spokesman said the traps were popular and there was no hire fee, just a $50 refundable deposit.

She said people hiring the traps had to read and sign a conditions of use contract which explained how to use the trap, informed the user of their responsibilities and described what to do once a cat was caught.

The advice says cats should not be left in a trap for more than 12 hours and that the animal must be offered clean drinking water.

It also says a trapped animal must be taken to the nearest pound.

“It’s not enough. Who knows how many cats are caught and then disposed of?” said Ms Cressy.



Albanese shrugs off LNP attacks on Labor's CQ coal approach

premium_icon Albanese shrugs off LNP attacks on Labor's CQ coal approach

He explained where the Labor Party sat regarding the coal sector.

World Championships the next stop for Rocky woman

premium_icon World Championships the next stop for Rocky woman

42-year-old local makes waves at international body building comp

Seaside city: Ludwig explains major benefits of name change

premium_icon Seaside city: Ludwig explains major benefits of name change

'REBRANDING would offer greater opportunity to grow tourism'

Local Partners