Cr Bill Ludwig says new government laws will have little impact at the Capricorn Coast where there was already a good understanding of the vulnerable areas. He wants to see the information updated every five or 10 years.
Cr Bill Ludwig says new government laws will have little impact at the Capricorn Coast where there was already a good understanding of the vulnerable areas. He wants to see the information updated every five or 10 years. Chris Ison

Coast boom set to continue

NEW state legislation aimed at protecting vulnerable coastal land from future urban development won’t do much to restrict the growth of Yeppoon, Emu Park and other parts of the Capricorn Coast, senior councillors say.

Environment Minister Kate Jones this week announced new laws to severely restrict building in areas at high risk of erosion and tidal surges.

A map showing the parts of the Capricorn Coast under threat of inundation of a metre or more during storm surges predicts large tracts of land near Zilzie, Kinka Beach, Causeway Lake, Mulambin, Rosslyn Bay, Lammermoor and Yeppoon could go under.

But Cr Bill Ludwig says the government information contains no surprises. And he’s confident the coast will continue to grow and thrive.

“A lot of these areas highlighted on the map were identified by Livingstone Shire Council years ago and I don’t see why the welcome intervention by the State Government should have a negative impact on planned major development at the Capricorn Coast,” he said. “The truth is we don’t know what will happen and if the impacts of climate change are going to be as great as predicted here, or worse.”

He said the modelling confirmed the council’s prediction that a serious tidal surge would flood most of Kinka Beach with more than a metre of water.

“There shouldn’t be any more development there,” he said. “But I don’t think there will be impacts on house and property prices for most people. We have a lot of high ground in the coast and 95% of the existing residential areas will not be affected.

“People are always going to want to live in coastal areas.”

Mayor Brad Carter said he believed the higher, safer blocks of land would be at a premium.

He said beach erosion was a big problem in some areas and there didn’t appear to be a way to prevent it.

“We have no plans as a council to put in man-made structures to prevent erosion because there is no consensus that they would work,” he said.



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