Forensic officers examine the scene of a shooting incident in June. A committal hearing was held yesterday into the incident.
Forensic officers examine the scene of a shooting incident in June. A committal hearing was held yesterday into the incident. File

Cops shot man four times in siege

A MAN who was shot four times by police at the end of a siege in Rockhampton was yesterday refused bail, six months after the incident.

Kieron Jay Oates yesterday limped into a courtroom dock – a prolonged injury from his gunshot wounds.

On June 16, Oates allegedly chased two police officers from his Stickley Street home after they banged on floorboards underneath the house in an attempt to coax him out, 24 hours into the siege.

Oates, armed with a knife, allegedly ran at the officers and police were forced to shoot him, the court was told yesterday.

The incident not only resulted in Oates, 32, being charged with attempted murder and a number of other criminal offences, but the Ethical Standards Command began a mandatory investigation into police conduct.

As the investigation is yet to be finalised, investigators refused to surrender documents and statements they complied during the inquiry.

But yesterday a magistrate ruled they must supply all material to Oates’ defence counsel to ensure he received a fair trial.

Police prosecution had earlier argued that defence barrister Justin Greggery was just on a “fishing expedition” and there was no need for the documents.

But Mr Greggery said it was vital to check inconsistencies in statements of officers and “get to the truth”.

“The way police went to draw (Oates) out of the house, they couldn’t have put themselves out of harms way without using the force they did,” he said.

“Whatever Ethical Standards have is relevant.”

The application for suppressed documents was yesterday made at the beginning of a committal hearing into the matter.

Mr Greggery told magistrate Damian Carroll that the tactic of banging underneath the home’s floorboards was a method used by negotiators to keep Oates awake during the siege.

He said the siege arose after Oates’ wife called police when things got out of hand at the house.

Oates was collecting his belongings because their relationship had ended, the court heard.

A number of civilian witnesses gave evidence during yesterday’s hearing.

One witness, a neighbour, told the court that Oates had thrown a knife at his wife prior to the siege.

The man said the siege situation was something that had been “brewing” for months.

He said he had heard Oates and his wife arguing and police had attended the residence a number of times.

“Their nonsense was spilling into our lives and we did not deserve it,” he said.

The Ethical Standards Command documents must be disclosed by January 21.

Evidence from police involved will be heard during March.



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