Rockhampton Regional Council adopted a strategy for signage across the region. This is an example of the signs planned for the region's smaller towns.
Rockhampton Regional Council adopted a strategy for signage across the region. This is an example of the signs planned for the region's smaller towns. Contributed

Council announces plans for iconic bulls

A BOLD new range of signs will soon welcome visitors to Rockhampton.

But residents can rest assured, no bulls will be harmed in the making of the city's new signage.

Rockhampton Regional Council was yesterday presented with designs for a series of new signs aimed at creating unified designs across the region.

The strategy outlines designs for a range of signs aimed which will welcome people to the city and surrounding regional towns.

A suite of signs will also be developed for each of Rockhampton's major precincts, including the riverbank, CBD, Kershaw Gardens, Mount Archer, and recreation areas.

These include 6m precinct markers, directional signs for pedestrians and vehicles fixed at different heights, maps and information boards, free-standing and mounted interpretation signs.

Precincts like the riverbank, Kershaw Gardens and Mount Archer have additional design variations within the overall theme of the strategy.

Mayor Margaret Strelow suggested council consider adding the Botanic Gardens to this list, rather than just using the general recreation area signage.

The airport will get special attention, with a new feature to catch the eye of those flying into the Beef Capital.

A three dimensional 4m high statement sculpture in the shape of an 'R' will be built at the exit, with a mix of evergreen and seasonal flowering plants to fill in the letter.

This will be complemented by a digital welcome sign with perforated steel cladding in place of the existing overhead signage at the airport's entry.

While the iconic bull won't be moving anywhere, there will also be a new feature sign constructed for the highways leading into the city.

The location will be determined by the Department of Transport and Main Roads at a later date.

Council also deferred the decision on the finer elements of the sign, including whether it should read "Rocky” or "Rockhampton”, to a later meeting.

Much of the signage will incorporate Central Queensland sandstone and galvanised steel to create a modern look with a nod to the city's heritage.

"The designs ... will contribute to the sense of place of Rockhampton through a bold and authentic palette of materials, forms, construction methods, colour and graphic elements which can be constructed locally following the tender process,” Cr Strelow said.

"Council believes that the full suite of signs more than meets the mark, performing the communication function it is intended for, contributes to the sense of place of the immediate environment (eg park, trail, city) and forms a continuous placemaking story throughout Rockhampton consisting of different but visually connected elements.”

The construction phase of the project is set to go to tender next year, with $200,000 allocated in council budgets for the next three years.



717 fires across Queensland in past five days

717 fires across Queensland in past five days

ALMOST 50 fires have started in Central Region in the past five days

'Heartbreaking loss': Cyclones beaten in QBL semi

premium_icon 'Heartbreaking loss': Cyclones beaten in QBL semi

Rocky team's championship hopes dashed by Townsville

CQ woman's burning desire to keep us safe

premium_icon CQ woman's burning desire to keep us safe

Naomi Barton's sizzling passion for safety

Local Partners