HARD WORKERS: Ron Bosomworth with his draft horse Tojo in 1953.
HARD WORKERS: Ron Bosomworth with his draft horse Tojo in 1953. Contributed

CQ family's great contribution to the Bouldercombe district

THE Bosomworth family first arrived in Bouldercombe in 1945.

They purchased one property from Mr Robert Heberlein from Mount Morgan (1906- 1984), and another from Mr Andy Tait. William (Bill) Bosomworth (1897-1981) and his son Ron (1927-2011) operated a dairy, sending the cream to the Port Curtis Butter Factory.

Ron Bosomworth holds a Hawaiian beauty watermelon.
Ron Bosomworth holds a Hawaiian beauty watermelon. Contributed

Ron's siblings Billy (1937-2007), Dawn, Johnny (1941-2018) and Alan (1945-2011) attended the Bouldercombe State School, which was a one-teacher school at the time.

Mr and Mrs Bosomworth's two remaining children were Gordon (1929-2000) and Eunice (1931-2013).

Ironically, Bill Bosomworth's youngest son, Alan married the second eldest granddaughter of Mr Heberlein, Denice in 1967.

Both Denice's father, Col Heberlein (1927-2008) and grandfather had lived on the same farm as her husband, Alan Bosomworth at different periods of time.

William (Bill) Bosomworth's Bedford truck working on the Mt. Morgan range road, circa 1935.
William (Bill) Bosomworth's Bedford truck working on the Mt. Morgan range road, circa 1935. Contributed

In 1948, Ron bought 26 acres of land on the main road from Mr R. Crone, for £104, and began small crop farming. He used his horse, Tojo, and a mouldboard plough to work the ground. As time progressed, he bought a Howard rotary hoe. Ron and his hoe were in great demand around the district, especially in the orchards, and before long the hoe had paid for itself. Ron also worked on many wells, on his property and for others. For this work, he was paid £1 a day.

Ron was a member of the Junior Farmers Association and represented the central district at the Royal Brisbane Show, where he met his wife, Dorothy, and married in 1953.

NO PLACE LIKE HOME: The original Bosomworth home, situated on the Burnett Highway before the Royal Hotel turn-off in Bouldercombe.
NO PLACE LIKE HOME: The original Bosomworth home, situated on the Burnett Highway before the Royal Hotel turn-off in Bouldercombe. Contributed

On moving to Bouldercombe, Dorothy was shocked on finding there was no electricity, and the district was not connected until 1957.

Mr A. Johnson Senior, who was a representative from the Fitzroy Shire Council and the C.R.E.B., made the official switching on of the power at the school.

Mrs Dicinoski and her daughter Valma (Mrs Brown) ran the only telephone exchange and post office, and the Bosomworth family were one of the few in the district who had an extension. Their number was 10.

SCHOOL DAYS: Ruth, Glenda, Peter and Kathleen Bosomworth.On their way to attend school, 1969.
SCHOOL DAYS: Ruth, Glenda, Peter and Kathleen Bosomworth.On their way to attend school, 1969. Contributed

Ron and Dorothy had seven children, (Graham, Glenda, Ruth, Kathleen, Peter, Darryl and Errol) and lived for many years on the property Ron had purchased for his small crops farm. The children all attended the Bouldercombe State School, which was still a one-teacher school until 1964 when it received a second teacher.

They sold this property and moved down the road next to the Youngs in 1966. Here they continued to grow small crops such as watermelons, rockmelons, tomatoes and citrus. They found there was a demand for a roadside stall, and as there was already a little shop on the property this was opened. A regular flow of customers from the Dawson Valley and Rockhampton came to purchase locally grown produce.

In 1981, Ron and Dorothy sold 80 of their 100 acres to Mr H. English who had it developed into Bouldercombe Park Estate.

They eventually sold the remainder of the property and moved back up the road, purchasing a home opposite from where they originally lived. Several of their children had settled in the district with their families and they have grandchildren who have attended the Bouldercombe State School.

The Bosomworth family's roadside produce stall on the Burnett Highway, beside the house. (Circa 1970).
The Bosomworth family's roadside produce stall on the Burnett Highway, beside the house. (Circa 1970). Contributed

Ron, always a farmer at heart, kept active with his vegetable plot and became an orchid enthusiast. For many years, Dorothy volunteered at the Bouldercombe State School as a religious instructor and also taught craft work. She was a foundation member of the Bouldercombe Craft Group who meet every fortnight to work on projects.

Because of ongoing health problems, Ron and Dorothy decided in mid 2003 to sell their Bouldercombe property and move to Rockhampton. This was a sad occasion in the district in losing two of its older residents.

The history of a house which Bill Bosomworth built in the town started after World War II, when he bought two US Army weatherboard mess huts which were left standing near Yeppoon Road.

They were transported by Percy Hinchliffe to Mr Bosomworth's block of land in one of the back blocks in Bouldercombe. Bill used these mess huts to build a house. He later sold the land and house to Sweet's.

Percy Hinchliffe bought the land and house from Sweets for farming, so they sold the house to Les Boyd, who cut it up into pieces which he could transport on trucks to its present site where he rebuilt it. It now stands at the end of Gumtree Avenue/Aremby Road on the site where Mr Tait's house used to be.

Information provided by Dorothy Bosomworth.



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