VALUABLE: CQUniversity PhD candidate Adam Rose (and inset) spent 28 months gathering water samples from the Baffle catchment which  for research that focuses on changes in drinking water sources that could be detrimental to human health.
VALUABLE: CQUniversity PhD candidate Adam Rose (and inset) spent 28 months gathering water samples from the Baffle catchment which for research that focuses on changes in drinking water sources that could be detrimental to human health. Contributed

CQ research's flow on impacts on science, students and industry

A CQUniversity researcher is leading the way in understanding the impacts of the environment on Australian water sources.

Adam Rose has been nominated for an award from a national organisation for his work to understand the ecological basis for human health risks associated with drinking water drawn from a sub-tropical freshwater catchment.

The state awards, run by the Australian Water Association, will be held in Brisbane tomorrow night.

Mr Rose spoke with The Morning Bulletin before the awards night about the work he has been doing that led to the nomination in the Student Prize Award.

The Yeppoon-based scientist said he spent 28 months collecting water samples from the Baffle Creek Basin Catchment - a water source that has not been changed by man in the form of damming or weirs - over two dry seasons, two wet seasons and two flooding events.

He said one of the flow-on benefits from this research was that the data and modelling he had collected and uncovered he was now teaching to regional students studying at CQUniversity.

"What we teach in uni (at the moment) is based on European and Northern American models,” Mr Rose said.

His data covered the impact of the 2013 floods that wiped out the Baffle Creek Tavern near Miriam Vale, and the following year's minor flooding of Central Queensland.

"My research affects every single person that lives,” Mr Rose said.

"Central Queensland hasn't been studied intensely.”

He has also been able to help Gladstone Regional Council find a solution to a problem, but he did not go into further detail as he wanted to keep some of the findings from his research secret until his full PhD had been published.

The data collected has led to a five-part PhD which Mr Rose hopes to finalise by Christmas.

He said he had published chapters of his PhD as he had completed them with the first chapter on predicting when the water would be at its highest risk to humans and the second chapter, looking at metals and minerals, published in the Journal of Hydrology.

"I hope to stay local,” Mr Rose said. "Having that local knowledge helps with the science and the students from regional areas.”



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