ON THURSDAY night she was out dancing with her friends.

On Friday she vomited at work.

By Sunday morning she was dead from meningococcal disease.

Health authorities have confirmed a 37-year-old Pomona woman who died barely 48 hours after enjoying her weekly night of line dancing with friends was a victim of the dreaded illness.

READ MORE: What you need to know about Meningococcal disease

The mother of two teenagers was reportedly in good spirits and "completely healthy" when she arrived for work at Noosa Council on Friday.

Within hours she had been admitted to Nambour General Hospital, where she passed away on Sunday morning.

"We're all completely shattered," a long-time friend said yesterday.

"She was so healthy and suddenly she's gone.

"We just can't believe how quickly it happened."

Dr Andrew Langley, Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service public health physician, confirmed the tragedy.

The service's public health experts are contacting anyone who may have had close contact with the woman in the period before her death.

"Only very close contacts such as family members need antibiotics as these people have a small risk of developing the disease," Dr Langley said.

"All other contacts are at much lower risk and need only information about the early symptoms so they can seek urgent medical advice in the unlikely situation where they develop symptoms."

Dr Langley said the woman's illness was the first known case of the disease in the region this year.

Last year, the public health unit was notified of six cases of meningococcal disease.

Noosa Council CEO Brett de Chastel said the council was deeply saddened.

"The staff member was a friend as well as a colleague to many at council, having been with the organisation for more than 20 years," he said.

"She will be remembered for her love of helping others, her keen role in organising council's social club and the many friendships she formed during her long career with council."

Council executives have been working with Queensland Health to explain the "extremely low" risk to other staff.

"Those who worked closely with the staff member were contacted over the weekend and advised to seek medical aid if they held any immediate concerns,'' Mr de Chastel said.

 



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