Flynn Hogan, now 10 years old, was born premature and is one of the Mater Hospital's miracle babies. Photo: Chris Ison / The Morning Bulletin
Flynn Hogan, now 10 years old, was born premature and is one of the Mater Hospital's miracle babies. Photo: Chris Ison / The Morning Bulletin Chris Ison

Flynn's arms were the same width as mum's thumb at birth

WHEN Flynn Hogan was born three months early, his arms were the same width as his mother's thumb.

His cry was so faint his mother, Dallas Hogan, could barely hear it.

His skin was transparent, his fingers were "like spaghetti" and he weighed only 637 grams.

When Dallas was 21 weeks pregnant, baby Flynn, who is now nine years old, stopped growing in her uterus.

At 26 weeks she was flown to Brisbane for specialised care at Mater's Maternal Fetal Medicine Unit where Flynn was diagnosed with fetal growth restriction, a life-threatening condition which meant blood wasn't flowing properly into his umbilical cord, stopping his growth.

This condition occurs in five to 10% of pregnancies.

He was monitored for five days and then was delivered by emergency caesarean at Mater Mothers' Hospital.

Dallas said the experience was horrifying.

"I still get emotional to this day and feel the pain that was experienced - to know that that our baby's chances of survival were only 70% and the chances of him having other issues were 85-90%."

Mater Miracle baby Flynn Hogan, now 10 years old, with his mother Dallas and staff from IGA Glenmore who are helping to raise money for the Mater Children's Hospital in Brisbane. Photo: Chris Ison / The Morning Bulletin
Mater Miracle baby Flynn Hogan, now 10 years old, with his mother Dallas and staff from IGA Glenmore who are helping to raise money for the Mater Children's Hospital in Brisbane. Photo: Chris Ison / The Morning Bulletin Chris Ison

Flynn fought on in the intensive care unit at Mater Mothers' Hospital in Brisbane for the next five months.

He had three operations and five blood transfusions before he spent another month closer to home at Rockhampton Mater Hospital.

"He was ventilated for three months, but this damaged his lungs.

"He developed chronic lung disease which he suffered for the first four years of his life.

"Flynn is a living example that miracles can and do happen."

This year the Hogans are giving their support to this year's Mater Little Miracles Easter Appeal, calling on local residents to get behind the appeal.

Yesterday, a healthy Flynn and his family spoke with The Morning Bulletin at the Glenmore IGA superette.

Flynn said his favourite subject, at his St Joseph's School in Wandal, was English.

"I like that and recess," he said.

The public can buy sporting-hero Miracle Max merchandise to support the Mater Little Miracles Easter Appeal.



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