Ipswich City Council Mayor Teresa Harding and INC Leading Hand Tara Snowling with Mirrigin (left) Photo: Ebony Graveur
Ipswich City Council Mayor Teresa Harding and INC Leading Hand Tara Snowling with Mirrigin (left) Photo: Ebony Graveur

Eagle’s amazing recovery after being ‘shot from the sky’

IMPOSING but majestic, Mirrigin the wedge-tailed eagle has made a new home for herself close to care and all the treats she could want.

During the past 2.5 years, she has undergone rehabilitation and extensive vet treatment after she was shot from the sky in 2017.

A couple spotted Mirrigin while she lay bleeding from the wound and rushed her to the vet, saving her life.

Nursed back to health after she was shot from the sky, Mirrigin the wedge-tailed eagle is now living at the Ipswich Nature Centre. Photo: Ebony Graveur
Nursed back to health after she was shot from the sky, Mirrigin the wedge-tailed eagle is now living at the Ipswich Nature Centre. Photo: Ebony Graveur

Though she made a full recovery at the Gatton University of Queensland Vets Small Animal Hospital, the bone in her wing failed to fuse, meaning she is tragically unable to soar to the great heights her kind a famous for.

Bird Medicine Specialist Associate Professor Bob Doneley said Mirrigin's wing required surgery.

"We put four pins in its wing and an external skeletal fixator bar," Prof Doneley said.

"During surgery, we found no signs of infection but a lot of dead tissue had to be removed from the fracture site."

 

Deemed unable to survive in the wild, the eagle was moved to the Ipswich zoo. Photo: Ebony Graveur
Deemed unable to survive in the wild, the eagle was moved to the Ipswich zoo. Photo: Ebony Graveur

Because she wouldn't be able to survive in the wild, the young wedge-tailed eagle was moved to a nine metre by four metre enclosure at the Ipswich Nature Centre.

"She had just finished her treatment and there was nothing more the vets could physically do for her so it was time for her to see how she adapted in this environment," INC Leading Hand Tara Snowling said.
"And she's doing really well."

 

Mirrigin, now 4, has learned how to land on her wildlife carer’s arm and be handfed. Photo: Ebony Graveur
Mirrigin, now 4, has learned how to land on her wildlife carer’s arm and be handfed. Photo: Ebony Graveur

Now four years old, Mirrigin has learned how to fly to and perch on her carer's arm to receive food.

Ipswich City Council Mayor Teresa Harding said she liked watching the eagle.

"She is a joy to watch as she extends her massive wings to get around as best she can," Cr Harding said.

Visitors to the nature centre can see Mirrigin along with more than 185 other Australian native animals and birds.

 

 

Read more news by Ebony Graveur.



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