Photos submitted by Malcolm Wells of Flying Fox information day at Appleton Park, was being held to educate the public on the Ross Creek bat colony, while also trying to address the negative stereotypes surrounding the mammals.
Photos submitted by Malcolm Wells of Flying Fox information day at Appleton Park, was being held to educate the public on the Ross Creek bat colony, while also trying to address the negative stereotypes surrounding the mammals.

GALLERY: Reader's photos from Flying Fox information day

THE Wildlife Preservation Society of Queensland held a Flying Fox Awareness Event on the weekend.

Greg said the event at Appleton Park, was held to educate the public on the Ross Creek bat colony, while also trying to address the negative stereotypes surrounding the mammals.

"There is a millennia of history of bats being vampires, evil and sinister and that has unfortunately worked its way into the psyche of our society and this is something we are trying to counteract," he said.

"They are a problem in that they poo on things, but that is about the worst thing they do.

"In regards to the disease and virus factor, they are very rare, it's very unusual, and in fact there are more people dying from dog attacks in Australia than bats.

"Bats are benign animals that are crucial to the environment and the health of our bushland."



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