Are girls just better at hiding the signs that would show them living with autism spectrum disorder?
Are girls just better at hiding the signs that would show them living with autism spectrum disorder?

Girls with autism spectrum disorder may suffer in silence

AUTISM spectrum disorder may affect as many girls as it does boys, but girls are simply better at hiding it.

That's the premise of a study at Bond University's Centre for Autism Spectrum Disorder, which is looking into the condition's effect on anxiety levels in girls versus boys.

CASD director Vicki Bitsika said currently one girl is diagnosed with ASD to every three boys, but clinicians suspect it may be closer to one to one.

She said the criteria used to identify autism are more likely to be seen in boys, such as difficulty with social skills and communication, as well as vocal distress or other visible behaviours.

"What we see with girls is that on the surface they appear to be more socially confident, understand their surroundings in more detail, more self-contained and less likely to engage in larger behaviours that indicate they might be in difficulty," she said.


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