This pile of rubbish was left behind at a popular Emu Park beach.
This pile of rubbish was left behind at a popular Emu Park beach. Picasa

Visitors' dirty little act on popular Capricorn Coast beach

VISITORS flocked to the Capricorn Coast over the festive season to enjoy the natural environment and fabulous weather conditions so it was a great shame to see blatant examples that not everyone respected the community's desire to maintain the natural integrity of the region.

Emu Park resident Robert Nohejl was disappointed by the sight of rubbish left behind by a visitor including used travel tickets along with broken bottles and rubbish on the sand banks of one of Emu Park's popular beaches.

 

DISGUSTING: Shelly McArdle of Capricornia Catchments, Holly Lambert of FBA and Aaron Horsey at one of the clean-ups.
DISGUSTING: Shelly McArdle of Capricornia Catchments, Holly Lambert of FBA and Aaron Horsey at one of the clean-ups.

"These people have travelled from Sydney to Brisbane according to their disposed airline tickets. They left behind a dangerous mess at Emu Park beach with no regard for the safety of others and the environmental health of the region," Mr Nohejl said.

"Small children play in this area. They don't look where they are playing and could easily be seriously hurt by the broken bottles not to mention the plastic strewn everywhere. It is time people showed more consideration."

Yeppoon resident Anne Frances discovered another similar pile of litter on the sand banks on Monkey Beach Great Keppel Island that contained what was obviously the leftovers of a group's litter from their festivities with broken glass, food scraps, plastic and paper waste tied in a plastic bag and disposed of in a remote position under a tree.

"People come to our region to enjoy the natural amenity so it seems a blatant disrespect for the area and the community to disregard common sense by not taking their litter with them," she said.

"We encourage people to visit our region. We are proud of the natural environment and are happy to share the benefits with visitors so it is terribly upsetting to see this kind of behaviour."

Capricorn Catchments project officer Shelly McArdle said hundreds of tonnes of litter were collected from the waterways and beaches each year by volunteers on regular clean-ups throughout the region.

"This is not just about making a mess. Litter causes a real threat to our wildlife both on and off the water, through entanglement, ingestion and obstruction," Ms McArdle said.

"I truly believe that if people knew more about some of the actual impacts of litter on our precious coastal and marine wildlife they would make sure they cleaned up after themselves.

"We love where we live and we want to preserve our beautiful environment and wildlife so that the Capricorn Coast continues to be a wonderful place for both locals and visitors to the region.

"All that is required is for people to be a little more mindful and dispose of their rubbish appropriately."



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