Michelle Neagle is beginning her nursing journey at medical and emergency in Yeppoon.
Michelle Neagle is beginning her nursing journey at medical and emergency in Yeppoon. Allan Reinikka ROK060218anurse1

Healthy signs for CQ as 44 graduates get a job

HEALING is in Michelle Neagle's blood.

The Yeppoon mother made the switch to nursing after spending eight years as a veterinary nurse.

Just like her vet father, Ms Neagle chose the medical profession due to her passion for caring for others.

"I'm an empathetic person so I enjoy making others' lives better at their most vulnerable time," Ms Neagle said.

This week marks Ms Neagle's first week in the workforce, alongside 43 other graduate nurses.

"I was offered two positions, one was in the emergency department at the base and the other was down in medical and emergency in Yeppoon," Ms Neagle said.

"I chose Yeppoon just because I'm local down there and I've got a little daughter so it's a lot more convenient and the staff are great down there."

Ms Neagle did her nursing studies at CQUniversity and undertook many of her placements at the Yeppoon hospital and the Rockhampton Hospital.

"The first six months is on the medical ward so it's all your general nursing which is really good at fine tuning those skills and then the next six months is in emergency, doing emergency medical treatment," Ms Neagle said.

"Coming here [to Rockhampton Hospital] yesterday and seeing all the people I went through uni with is just a really good feeling. You know people already and those familiar faces makes it a little less daunting.

"I hope to stay in Yeppoon and I have aspirations to maybe become a nurse practitioner. They've got some really great practitioners in Yeppoon and it'd be great to work them and get some experiences.

After coming to Australia from India 10 years ago, and moving to Rockhampton five years ago, Navneet Kaur undertook her nursing degree at CQUniversity.

Ms Kaur was offered a graduate position in a surgical ward starting this week.

 

Executive director of nursing and midwifery at Rockhampton Hospital Sandy Munro.
Executive director of nursing and midwifery at Rockhampton Hospital Sandy Munro. Allan Reinikka ROK060218anurse2

"It's very exciting," she said.

"This first week is the training and from next week I'll go up into the ward.

"I did my surgical placement here in 2016 so I'm one of the lucky ones that got through.

"Rockhampton Hospital was my first choice of a hospital because I did a majority of my placements here and the staff and the support we get as students here is just marvellous.

"Peer support is really great throughout uni and it's great to see the same group that I was in and most of them have gotten jobs here."

Ms Kaur plans on going into the surgical area in the future and following her masters up "in a clinical setting".

Executive director of nursing and midwifery at Rockhampton Hospital Sandy Munro graduate nurses are the "future for a sustainable workforce and growing the workforce into the future".

"They're newly registered nurses who start with us on a annual basis, so we take in a program every year," Ms Munro said.

"They work across our organisations, so they go into various clinical units to work in a supportive capacity with existing trained and experienced nurses.

"Each year we just grow year on year for being a first preference for our graduate nurses and that's facilitated because we take them as undergraduate students so they get to know us and socialise with us and work with us so then we become an employer of choice."



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