The use of unmarked speed cameras has come under fire from the Queensland Police Union. Picture: Jerad Williams
The use of unmarked speed cameras has come under fire from the Queensland Police Union. Picture: Jerad Williams

Hidden speed cameras do little to combat road toll

I HAVE absolutely no sympathy for speeding drivers, drink drivers or those stupid enough to be texting while driving - especially on the highway or a motorway.

But are hidden, unmanned and fixed cameras really the best way of dealing with offenders?

How effective in changing behaviour is getting a speeding fine a month after the event?

There are 18 unmarked mobile speed camera vehicles in use across Queensland.

During the 2016-17 financial year there were 106,741 notices issued by unmarked mobile speed cameras and 163,176 notices issued by marked mobile speed cameras.

Surely, having more police on our roads, intercepting offenders, is a better method of reducing the road toll.

Yes, it costs more money.

And will certainly generate less revenue.

But what is the end goal here?

Is it trying to get as many people hit with penalties as possible and generate millions in fines?

Or is it about trying to prevent tragedies before they happen?

You only have to consider the long term costs of car accidents on taxpayers to know putting more police on the roads is a smart investment.

Marked speed cameras over the M1 at Logan. Picture: Mark Cranitch
Marked speed cameras over the M1 at Logan. Picture: Mark Cranitch



Of course, those who support speed cameras will argue that if you don't speed it won't be a problem.

But there are times when some of the camera placements are downright unfair.

Putting a camera where the speed limit has just changed from 80km/h to 60km/h is likely to do little for the reputation of police as a whole.

Do you support the use of covert speed cameras?

This poll ended on 24 January 2018.

Current Results

Yes, if you speed you should be fined

54%

No, they don't stop the behaviour

14%

Depends on where they are used

9%

More police on the roads would be better

21%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.



Police union president Ian Leavers argues: "Policing has always been a partnership with the community and is most successful when we do it with the co-operation of the community.

LNP treasury spokesman Tim Mander has promised to abolish covert speed cameras.

"Making drivers feel like they have been trapped by a speed camera does nothing to achieve road safety outcomes," he told the Courier-Mail.

"The LNP will sign all speed cameras, we will get rid of covert cameras and Labor's revenue raising."

Assistant Commissioner Mike Keating, who heads the Road Policing Command, argues independent reviews suggested there was a good balance in Queensland between overt and covert speed camera programs.

What do you think? Should the covert cameras go in favour of more police on our roads? Or do you think we have the balance right in Queensland?

News Corp Australia


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