Fraser Coast Anglican College year 3 student Oluwatobi Adewumi, year 7 student Caidyn Hunt, year 3 student Diva Ejembi and year 4 student Courtney Adams.
Fraser Coast Anglican College year 3 student Oluwatobi Adewumi, year 7 student Caidyn Hunt, year 3 student Diva Ejembi and year 4 student Courtney Adams. Jessica Lamb

How our top NAPLAN school did it

EFFECTIVE, engaging teachers, high standards and a focus on developing the mind, body and spirit of each student is the recipe for success for Fraser Coast Anglican College.

An independent analysis of five years of NAPLAN results for Year 5 and Year 9 tests from 2015-2019 has revealed Fraser Coast Anglican College had the highest results in both categories on the Fraser Coast.

The results showed for the five years Fraser Coast Anglican College had higher Year 5 yearly results than any other school in the state.

"The biggest factor that affects the student is the quality of the teacher standing in front of them," College principal Joe Wright said.

"We make sure we have experienced, effective teachers who are just good at getting the best out of their students.

"If they have a good relationship with their teacher they're more engaged in learning. There's a lot of research showing the relationship with teachers is an important factor."

Mr Wright said Anglican schools were known for having high academic standards and doing well in NAPLAN and Year 12 results.

"We set high standards for all students and let them know if they work hard they can keep improving," he said.

Setting high standards of behaviour and conduct was also important and meant less time was taken up by classroom management and more time spent learning, he said.

Mr Wright said while academic performance was an important aspect of school the college focused on the holistic development of each student.

 

 

He said NAPLAN was regarded as just something else that happened in the school.

While children were encouraged "to sit the test and do their best, it's not what defines us as a school," he said.

"We believe in investing in our students so they become confident and creative individuals who are active in our community as well as developing them as successful learners who can apply their skills to whatever challenges are placed before them.

"Resilience, being able to work with other people and good manners are things you won't see on the test, unfortunately," he said.



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