‘I had to learn to walk, talk, eat, swim — everything’

SIX years ago doctors told Luke "Lukey" Muir's family there was a three per cent chance he would wake up, and even less of a chance he would live a normal life.

Now the 27-year-old proved them all wrong.

The Brighton resident wants to use his experience to inspire and motivate others.

Mr Muir, fell off a skateboard while riding down a hill, without a helmet, in 2013.

He was 20 and just four weeks away from finishing his carpentry apprenticeship.

"I was in a coma for five weeks," the former Nudgee College student said.

"My family thought I was going to die. They had all come and said goodbye.

"I woke up the day they were going to turn off the life support."

Brighton's Luke Muir has come along way since a horrific skateboarding accident left him in a coma six years ago. Photo Erin Smith
Brighton's Luke Muir has come along way since a horrific skateboarding accident left him in a coma six years ago. Photo Erin Smith

His incredible story of resilience and positive outlook on life was put in the spotlight after being given the opportunity to travel to the Great Barrier Reef with the Yes Theory and team from Spinning The Globe And Flying Wherever It Lands.

The hosts approached Mr Muir while he was working and asked him if he would like to travel to the Great Barrier Reef with them, that night.

Mr Muir said yes.

The video, during which Mr Muir opens up about his journey, has been viewed almost four million times.

Mr Muir said since then he had been inundated with messages from people all around the world saying how his story had changed their lives, given them a new outlook and inspired them.

However, the journey to this points was not easy for Mr Muir.

After waking up, doctors told his family he would be brain damaged, never able to walk or talk again.

"I spent six months in hospital, in the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit at the PA Hospital," he said.

"I had to learn to walk, talk, eat, swim - everything."

 

Brighton's Luke Muir reflects on his time in hospital after his brain injury. Photo Erin Smith
Brighton's Luke Muir reflects on his time in hospital after his brain injury. Photo Erin Smith

He said learning how to speak was the hardest part of the recovery process.

"My brain knew I could do it, but I couldn't physically make it happen. I just kept stuttering," Mr Muir said.

While he can now talk, walk, eat and live independently there are a few lasting side effects from the injury.

He walks with a limp due to problems with his left leg, has limited use of his left arm, has no sense of smell and can struggle to retain short-term memories.

After six months he was able to leave the hospital. Mr Muir said he can still remember that moment "I had tears in my eyes".

And he as not looked back since.

"I just want to keep moving forward," Mr Muir said.

He tried to go back and finish his apprenticeship but said he could not remember anything and struggled with the work.

"I qualified for the disability pension but I didn't want to just sit around at home," Mr Muir said.

He first got a job with HeartKids and now works as a traffic controller.

Mr Muir has also teamed up with Tribe - Social Belonging, in Redcliffe, using his story to inspire other job seekers.

"Being an inspirational story is my ultimate goal at the moment," he said.

You can follow Luke on Instagram.



PHOTO GALLERY: Celebrating Australia Day on the coast

premium_icon PHOTO GALLERY: Celebrating Australia Day on the coast

There was plenty of fun to be had on Yeppoon’s foreshore yesterday.

New furry-friendly business opens in town

premium_icon New furry-friendly business opens in town

The shop plans to sell birds, fish and guinea pigs and will specialise in tailored...

Youngter’s big hearted gesture for Rocky Zoo

premium_icon Youngter’s big hearted gesture for Rocky Zoo

Six-year-old’s plan to collect and recycle cans, with hopes to later cash them in...