Why has it taken so long to invent stockings that don’t run? Picture: Supplied
Why has it taken so long to invent stockings that don’t run? Picture: Supplied

‘Indestructible’ stockings exist

Inventing a pair of stockings that don't run has for years seemed as impossible as reinventing the wheel.

However, that is about to change with the news that Sheertex has done the unthinkable - invented stockings that are "indestructible".

The Canadian company began shipping in December but announced at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas that it will be ramping up and expanding production due to popular demand.

The pantyhose, which currently can only be ordered online in black, will soon come in three shades of nude.

For many, the CES was the first opportunity to put Sheertex Sheers to the test.

As many people as I saw line up to test the product, not one was successful at ripping the stockings. Not even when it got caught in a zipper.

Sheertex has designed a patent-pending blend of fibres included in bulletproof vests and climbing equipment.

 

Sheertex
Sheertex

 

It is a ultra high molecular weight polythene but unlike bulletproof vests the stockings are thin and stretchy.

The company says the fabric is "lighter than water" and "10 times stronger pound by pound than steel".

The company wanted to raise $US10,000 on Indiegogo and managed to raised more than $US33,000, so demand for pantyhose that don't run is obviously high.

In a world where it is possible to invent flying cars and robotic suitcases, why has it taken so long to design pantyhose that don't run?

 

This journalist travelled to the CES in Las Vegas courtesy of Samsung.



REVEALED: Local spend on Shoalwater Bay expansion so far

premium_icon REVEALED: Local spend on Shoalwater Bay expansion so far

First phase contract spend 'just the beginning'

Industries work together to grow local tourism

premium_icon Industries work together to grow local tourism

Central Highlands' tourism industry to gather for strategies

Cabinetmaker has big plans to restore 123-year-old home

premium_icon Cabinetmaker has big plans to restore 123-year-old home

Built in 1896, it first served as a boarding house, then a hospital