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Mother-of-three smuggles drugs into prison for inmate

SHEREE Helen Wolstenholme never had a criminal record until she met Jermaine Leigh Slater.

The mother-of-three became involved with Slater, who was already on the wrong side of the law, and convinced her to smuggle drugs into prison for him.

Rockhampton District Court yesterday heard Slater, 35, had been serving time in jail for drug charges when he requested Wolstenholme bring drugs to him, including methamphetamine.

The Rockhampton woman also tried to smuggle USB drives, tobacco and cigarettes.

The pair pleaded guilty to two counts each of supplying dangerous drugs.

Justice Duncan McMeekin was "astounded" to see Wolstenholme sitting in the docks, as she had good character references and her family, including her children, were in the court and visibly upset at their mother's situation.

Justice McMeekin said Wolstenholme had supplied the drugs to Slater "at his request".

"You undermine the discipline of the prison and undermine Slater's chances of rehabilitation," he said.

Justice McMeekin noted the quantity of the drug was small and for Slater's private use.

However, he told Slater he was a "mature man and need to take responsibility".

You could see the relief on Wolstenholme's face when she was granted immediate parole, while her children were in tears as they waited to embrace their mother when she was released from custody.

She was sentenced to six months on the first count and four months on the second count, with immediate parole.

Slater, who has been behind bars since mid-2014, was convicted and received no further punishment.

This isn't the first time people have been caught trying to smuggle drugs into prisons, with the Capricornia Correctional Centre recording 28 drug seizures over the past two years compared to 89 at Maryborough's prison.

Figures obtained in October show the most popular substances prisoners are being caught with at the Rockhampton prison include buprenorphine, smoking devices and alcohol.

A Queensland Corrective Services spokesman told The Bulletin the organisation took the control of contraband in prisons very seriously.

He said procedures were in place to ensure cells were randomly checked and information received was acted on swiftly.

"Prisoners often take extreme measures to smuggle contraband into prisons," he said.

"Drug detection and testing are vital tools in keeping our prisons as free of drugs as possible.

"We maintain an extensive drug testing regime and use a range of detection strategies including intelligence, passive alert drug detection and joint operations with the Queensland Police Service."

COMMON DRUGS

The drugs most used before entering prison

Marijuana 50%

Methamphetamine 37%

Pain killers 17%

Heroin 15%

Topics:  drugs editors picks inmate prison rockhampton



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