L-R Chris Deadman (Cameraman), Chris Parsons (TV Presenter), Chris Duane (Coastal Funk co-owner) and Chris Ison (Morning Bulletin photographer) mark the impromtu gathering of four Chris's in the same spot at the same time. Photo: Trinette Stevens / The Morning Bulletin
L-R Chris Deadman (Cameraman), Chris Parsons (TV Presenter), Chris Duane (Coastal Funk co-owner) and Chris Ison (Morning Bulletin photographer) mark the impromtu gathering of four Chris's in the same spot at the same time. Photo: Trinette Stevens / The Morning Bulletin Trinette Stevens

Introduction of Chrises started getting Python-esque

IT'S not every day you walk into a situation straight out of a Monty Python comedy sketch, but that's what happened when I recently went to photograph a visiting television crew in Yeppoon.

"Chris," I introduced myself to the Queensland Weekender presenter, who turned to Coastal Funk owner Chris Duane, who he was part way through interviewing, and said "Meet Chris". That in itself was not uncommon for I often meet fellow "Chrises" in my line of work.

But then it started getting Python-esque.

The cameraman popped out from behind his camera introducing himself as Chris, Chris Deadman that is, and finally the presenter said he too was named Chris, Chris Parsons.

With so many calls of "Chris" being flung around the room it was not clear for a moment or two if we were each introducing ourselves as Chris, or asking if Chris was the name of the person we were introducing ourselves to.

And so it went along the lines of "My name's Chris", "You're Chris too? My name's Chris". "Meet Chris, he's called Chris too".

And on it went until we finally established that, yes, we all answer to the name Chris.

None of us could think of an occasion where we had met so many other Chrises among such a small group of people.

After getting my photo I left my fellow Chrises to their filming to the calls of "See you later, Chris", "Bye Chris", "Have a good one, Chris".

On my way back to the office I pondered the odds of this happening so I Googled the popularity of Chris as a first name. The best I could find was that around one per cent of Australian males are named Chris, so what are the chances of four random Chrises meeting under similar circumstances?

If my grasp of probability theory is correct, and I make no definitive claim that it is, the chances of such an event happening are greater than the chance of winning first division in the lottery.

Working on a statistical average of one person in 100 being named Chris, the probability of a person standing in a room being named Chris is about 100 to one.

The chances of two Chrises meeting in that room are increased to 10,000 to one.

The odds go up to one million to one for three Chrises meeting in that room and for four random Chrises to congregate in one room by themselves it's a whopping 100 million to one.

Perhaps we each should have gone and bought a lotto ticket. But then, what would the odds have been that we would have shared in the first division winnings? Off the planet.



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