Julie Davies and Tony Sams at the Global Climate Strike in Yeppoon last week
Julie Davies and Tony Sams at the Global Climate Strike in Yeppoon last week

It’s not only Millenials up in arms about climate change

SUPPORTING the students who attended the Global Climate Strike at Yeppoon's Main Beach last Friday were the mums and grandmothers who felt their generation didn't fight hard enough.

"I think this is this generation's Vietnam," said Shannon Tracey who proudly held up banners alongside her daughter and mother.

 

 

 

"If people don't start doing something about climate change now, it's going to be a horrific future for everyone."

Ali Cargill said the decision to home school their children was in part based on having the time to talk "about what is most important in the world" and to join in community events such as the Global Climate Strike, which took place in more than 130 countries.

She began the day reviewing footage of Greta Thunberg with her kids to get them "revved up".

 

Aria, Sharaya, Ali and Jaali Cargill at the Global Climate Strike on Yeppoon's Main Beach Friday September 20
Aria, Sharaya, Ali and Jaali Cargill at the Global Climate Strike on Yeppoon's Main Beach Friday September 20

 

Christine Fraser and Bobbie Patterson, who both live on the coast, attended the rally with ten-month old poodle Stella Maris.

"It's an important issue not only for our piece of paradise but for the world," Mrs Fraser said.

"We need to get governments to pay attention, particularly the Australian Government which is lagging behind."

When asked whether strikes and rallies would have an impact on government legislation, Mrs Fraser said it was a hard call.

 

Christine Fraser, Stella Maris and Bobbie Patterson joined the Global Climate Strike in Yeppoon last week
Christine Fraser, Stella Maris and Bobbie Patterson joined the Global Climate Strike in Yeppoon last week

 

"The government finds any reason it can to devalue anyone expressing an opinion," she said.

"That doesn't mean you stop doing it."

Mary-Anne Jones from Yeppoon, who has six grandchildren, said the world's climate was at a crisis point.

"We must show support for the schoolchildren because it's for all of us and the planet," she said.

She was sitting next to Sambuddhananda Saraswati, who said the impact of climate change along her own stretch of Farnborough Beach over the last 12 years alone was obvious.

"Walking along the beach very day, there's no doubt the algae has been coming in earlier every year," she said.

"As women, we're more attuned to cycles and we're more intuitive.

 

Mary-Anne Jones, Sambuddhananda Saraswati, Maggie Day and Sue Sherratt at the Global Climate Strike in Yeppoon
Mary-Anne Jones, Sambuddhananda Saraswati, Maggie Day and Sue Sherratt at the Global Climate Strike in Yeppoon

 

"Our opinions were pushed aside when we were growing up in the 70s; even though it was the start of feminism we still didn't speak out.

It's necessary we support this generation of children to speak up."

Sue Sherratt is visiting from Camden in the southwest of Sydney, and has her own personal reasons to fear the impact of climate change.

Great-grandmother to two, Mrs Sherratt has Lyme disease, a tick-borne infection which causes fever, headache and swollen joints and lymph nodes.

"All over the world the ticks are becoming more prevalent due to climate change," she said.

Indeed, the Mayo Clinic in the US described the projected two per cent increase in average mid-century temperatures as a "ticking time bomb".

Its 2018 report anticipates a 20 per cent increase in Lyme disease infections.

Maggie Day from Yeppoon, who has nine grandchildren and six great-grandchildren, joined in supporting the children's strike action, despite the keyboard warriors who decry them.

"I'm really concerned for the world my grandchildren will live in," she said.

Julie Davies from Coowonga doesn't pull any punches when it comes to speaking out against the government's lack of action on climate change.

"Our generation stuffed it up, and the governments have wussed out," she said.

"They're too busy looking after short term electoral cycles to look after these children's future."

Ms Davies was one of a group of people who first introduced environmental protection legislation into the Queensland parliament in the early 90s, and she said the legislation hadn't progressed since then.

She studied environmental science and politics in Brisbane in her 40s, before moving to the Capricorn Coast as district operations manager for the EPA team.

"Our generation was brought up to be polite and quiet so we didn't do enough," she said.

"We were too cowardly which is why I'm out here today supporting these students."

Ms Davies said people of her generation who are concerned about climate change should get out and make their views public.

"You have to support the science and not let anyone tell you you're a silly minority," she said.

"I wouldn't question my mechanic because he knows more about car engines than I do.

"Yet the guy putting the roof on your house is going to rubbish the science behind climate change?"

Given the viciousness of online detractors, Ms Davies warned against letting young children protest against climate change online.

"That doesn't mean they can't do things like recycling and reducing the amount of stuff they buy and chuck away," she said

She encouraged them to "nag' their parents and keep on the government's back.

"In the old days they used to actually arrest us for standing up for what we believed in," she said.

"Today's children should avoid the keyboard warriors altogether and strengthen themselves by attending events such as today's Global Climate Strike."



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