Mohinder Singh has been handed his sentence, with a judge saying there was “no hope” of survival for the police officers killed in the horror crash.
Mohinder Singh has been handed his sentence, with a judge saying there was “no hope” of survival for the police officers killed in the horror crash.

Cop killer truckie learns fate

The killer truck driver who crashed into four police officers on the Eastern Freeway will spend at least 18½ years behind bars.

Mohinder Singh, 47, hit and killed police officers Lynette Taylor, Glen Humphris, Josh Prestney and Kevin King on April 22 after veering his truck into the emergency lane where the officers were standing.

Justice Paul Coghlan on Wednesday sentenced him to a maximum jail term of 22 years.

Singh, who has been on remand since the April 22, 2020 crash, will be eligible for parole in 17 years and six months after he spent the past year in prison.

Justice Coghlan said the "chilling" footage depicting the last moments of the four police officers' lives revealed "they had no hope".

Mohinder Singh arriving at the Victorian Supreme Court last month. Picture: NCA NewsWire/David Crosling
Mohinder Singh arriving at the Victorian Supreme Court last month. Picture: NCA NewsWire/David Crosling

"Their deaths are entirely unnecessary, and should have been avoided," Justice Coghlan told the Supreme Court on Wednesday morning.

"Their deaths were caused by you," he told Singh, who listened to his sentence from the dock of court five.

Justice Coghlan said many Victorians would remember the horror events of April 22 - Victoria Police's darkest day.

"They'll remember the reports on the evening news … they are events which shocked the public conscience," Justice Coghlan said.

"The unnecessary loss of the lives of four serving police officers simply going about their duty is a matter of huge community sorrow and regret."

Justice Coghlan said the grief experienced by the fallen officers' loved ones was "profound and life changing".

 

Senior Constable Kevin King.
Senior Constable Kevin King.

"(That grief) is heightened by the saddening and unnecessary nature of the deaths," his honour said.

Justice Coghlan carefully detailed Singh's "inexplicable" behaviour in the days leading up to the evening of the crash.

The court heard Singh had been sleep-deprived, drug-affected and paranoid about being followed by a witch.

Despite this, the father-of-two continued to get behind the wheel of the truck, despite admitting to colleagues he had "nodded off" while driving.

One witness who saw Singh hours before the crash said: "I've never seen someone as drug f---ed.

"He hadn't slept for eight days and he was falling asleep … though he never actually slept".

CCTV footage along the Eastern Freeway showed Singh's refrigerated delivery truck repeatedly drifting into the emergency lanes and veering across lanes without indicating before the deadly crash.

Todd Robinson, partner of Constable Glen Humphris, leads family and friends into court. Picture: NCA NewsWire/Ian Currie
Todd Robinson, partner of Constable Glen Humphris, leads family and friends into court. Picture: NCA NewsWire/Ian Currie

A witness driving near the truck remarked to his mother: "this dude's going to f---ing kill someone".

Singh did not react or brake until after the moment of impact.

The families of the fallen officers attended the Supreme Court of Victoria to watch Justice Paul Coghlan deliver his sentence.

Earlier this month, grieving relatives came face-to-face with Singh in court to read powerful victim impact statements describing the day their lives were changed forever by his "selfish" actions.

Singh has pleaded guilty to four counts of culpable driving causing death and three charges of trafficking in a drug of dependence and one charge of possessing a drug of dependence.

The court earlier heard Singh had been doing drug deals between deliveries - and expressed concerns about his state to be driving to his boss only an hour before the deadly crash.

Originally published as Killer Eastern Freeway truckie learns fate

Leading Senior Constable Lynette Taylor.
Leading Senior Constable Lynette Taylor.
Constable Joshua Prestney.
Constable Joshua Prestney.
Constable Glen Humphris.
Constable Glen Humphris.
Leading Senior Constable Lynette Taylor’s partner, Stuart Schultz, arrives at the sentencing. Picture: NCA NewsWire/Ian Currie
Leading Senior Constable Lynette Taylor’s partner, Stuart Schultz, arrives at the sentencing. Picture: NCA NewsWire/Ian Currie


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