Rockhampton South Kindergarten kids and teachers.
Rockhampton South Kindergarten kids and teachers.

Kindy kids’ important open letter to the residents of Rocky

ROCKHAMPTON South Kindergarten kids last week cleaned litter from the Botanic Gardens and wrote the Rockhampton public a letter asking that the environment be kept tidy.

After creating dioramas of the ocean for National Science Week in late August, the children came to kindy one day to find those oceans polluted – rubbish had somehow got into the waterways and the throats of animals represented in miniature.

Teacher Deanna Cini said that got everybody talking about keeping Rockhampton’s environment in good health.

“We started talking about how we care for the land,” she said.

“What would happen if there was rubbish in our garden?”

Last Thursday, the class went on an excursion to the Botanic Gardens with two goals in mind: pick up any rubbish and count the number of bins available for the public to use.

Joshua said he enjoyed walking to find rubbish, because it was “important so the birds don’t get it and get sick.

“The birds may die,” he said.

Cleaning up the Botanic Gardens.
Cleaning up the Botanic Gardens.

Henry had the same logic – “to keep the gardens safe”.

“It is so the animals don’t come out and eat it,” he said.

“The plants don’t like it too.”

Aaron described the day’s process: “We put [rubbish] in the bag; we fill the bags and come to kindy, and Deanna sort it.”

And Sienna enjoyed being “at the park with my friend”.

“I saw rubbish and I put it in the bin,” she said.

Eliza's letter to Rockhampton residents.
Eliza's letter to Rockhampton residents.

Together the children filled two bags with litter and found 24 bins.

They finished the investigation by writing a letter to Rockhampton Regional Council and a public letter to everyone who uses the gardens.

The class also made posters, some of which will be displayed at the Gardens Tearooms, telling people not to feed wild birds.

A poster asking people not to feed the birds.
A poster asking people not to feed the birds.

“They wouldn’t let us walk past any piece of rubbish without picking it up,” Ms Cini said.

“They’d all gone home and told their parents that if they see people dropping rubbish, they’re going to tell them they have to pick it up.

“They’re really quite passionate about the whole rubbish side of it.”



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