Allan Briggs with a thornbill nest, about the same size as the mud nest a Welcome Swallow makes. Photo Sharyn O'Neill / The Morning Bulletin
Allan Briggs with a thornbill nest, about the same size as the mud nest a Welcome Swallow makes. Photo Sharyn O'Neill / The Morning Bulletin Sharyn O'Neill ROK251113snest1

Leave well alone until it’s time to fly the nest - Birdlife

IT'S the time of year where the sun is shining day after day, flowers are blooming and birds are singing from nests full of chirping young ones.

But BirdLife Capricornia is warning people not to remove nests with live chicks in them.

After reports that people were removing nests or asking wildlife carers to take chicks from nests so they could be removed, BirdLife Capricornia Secretary Allan Briggs said it was illegal to interfere with any native bird.

"At this time of year many birds are nesting and often they will nest in places such as under eaves or in gutters and some people would like them removed because they look unsightly or they want to clean their house," he said.

"It only takes a few weeks for young nestlings to grow and leave the nest so we would encourage people to leave the nests until after the breeding season."

Welcome swallows commonly nest under eaves, but Mr Briggs said they were unlikely to cause infestations of mites or lice.

He said nests were typically 20-25cm long, made of mud and usually under an overhang.

Birds will lay four to six eggs that take two weeks to hatch, and another three weeks until young birds fly.

"You can easily determine if a nest is being used by watching to see if a bird is sitting on the nest during incubation, or flying back and forth from the nest to feed the chicks," he said.

To remove the nests, Mr Briggs recommends checking for any remaining eggs or chicks; using gloves to avoid contamination from mites, bacteria or parasites and cleaning the area with a solution of one part chlorine to nine parts water if necessary (not trees or bushes).

If possible discard the nest in a compost bin or in a plastic bag.

For more information contact BirdLife Capricornia on 49354645 or abriggs@irock.com.au, or Parks and Wildlife office.



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