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LETTER: Polarised society defends agendas

CONTROVERSIAL FIGURE: President Donald Trump applauds members of the audience before speaking at the Heritage Foundation's annual President's Club meeting in Washington.
CONTROVERSIAL FIGURE: President Donald Trump applauds members of the audience before speaking at the Heritage Foundation's annual President's Club meeting in Washington. Pablo Martinez Monsivais

I WROTE yesterday regarding the shoddy way our TV treats those on the right of politics, emphasising the "Trump Syndrome” which is endemic here in Australia.

Now is as good a time as any to confess that I do not care for Donald Trump as a person and I am skeptical of his position as president.

But it matters not who we place in positions of responsibility, sooner or later they are going to kick off their shoes and reveal their "feet of clay”.

That can be taken as read.

But most of us fail to look beyond the real or imagined prejudices which we bring to bear on our assessment of any leader.

We as a nation turned our back on the standards that had guided us for centuries and obviously the quality of not only the candidates for office declined but we found ourselves with lower expectations of both them and us.

Many absolutes became relatives and we failed to notice the downward trend of the whole human family.

I now believe that when the media denounces Mr Trump or his decisions that it is no way related to the once cherished values of righteousness that have long since disappeared from our new "politically correct” world. Our polarised society now defends agendas, whether it be right or left, personal identifications, gender politics, or the right to marry who or what we demand.

We are adrift without an anchor and are trying to keep our heads above a flood of our own making by bringing down another imperfect human being. We may also be failing to consider that Mr Trump may have been put there for reasons that elude most of us. Just sayin'.

Al Byrnand

Wandal

Topics:  donald trump letters to the editor



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