PROUD RECORD: Teys Biloela general manager Duncan Downie (left) and livestock buyer Laura Grubb.
PROUD RECORD: Teys Biloela general manager Duncan Downie (left) and livestock buyer Laura Grubb. Andrew Thorpe

Meatworks should focus on 'jobs for our youth, not refugees'

YOU can call Dominic Doblo a redneck. You can call him a racist. He doesn't mind.

What he does care about is seeing jobs created for Central Queenslanders, particularly our at-risk youth.

That's why the controversial businessman has spoken out publicly after a report that a major CQ meatworks is looking to recruit Syrian refugees.

READ: CQ meatworks looks to Syrian refugees to fill worker gap.

Last week Teys Australia Biloela announced it was struggling to find locals wanting to work and was in the process of gauging public sentiment to the Syrian option.

The piece sparked a flurry of activity on social media, much of it along the lines of Mr Doblo's position.

For him the answer is simple. No-one should come to work in the region unless jobs are available.

And, any job opportunities need to be filled by locals first.

He said governments had an obligation to work with large employers to make sure at-risk children who weren't going to move into white-collar careers were trained for these jobs.

The biggest risk was unproductive youngsters falling into a cycle of unemployment and crime.

And he had a message for anyone who wanted to accuse him of being a racist.

"I appreciate people saying we have a moral responsibility to help these people from troubled parts of the world, but our bigger responsibility is to help young people from our part,” Mr Doblo said.

"Come down to the court house in Rockhampton with me and have a look at all these young people who need a job.

"I'll take anyone who thinks there isn't a problem.”

He said a worrying number of young people had become dependent on government entitlements.

Mr Doblo said any youngster who didn't accept training or work should lose these benefits.

A spokesman for Teys yesterday said the company employed about 1300 people across Central Queensland.

The spokesman said the company refuted any suggestion Australians were being overlooked and pointed to the frequent advertisements for jobs.

He said Teys only turned to its refugee and 457 Visa programs when locals couldn't fill the demand.

"We are extremely proud of all the people who work for our business,” the spokesman said.

He said the company was also proud of how the workers of all nationalities fitted into the community and "by and large” how the communities embraced them.



Crikey! 4m croc spotted near kids on Fitzroy River

Crikey! 4m croc spotted near kids on Fitzroy River

Rocky fisherman almost has a close encounter with croc

Judge cautions jury as verdict hangs overnight

premium_icon Judge cautions jury as verdict hangs overnight

Defence calls no witnesses in "complex” trial

Chinese student delegation builds stronger CQ ties

premium_icon Chinese student delegation builds stronger CQ ties

The international student market is worth a lot to the local economy

Local Partners