COMMUNITY SPIRIT: 10k yellowbelly and silverperch fingerlings were released into their new home in the Gil Weir, outside of Miles. Pic: Supplied
COMMUNITY SPIRIT: 10k yellowbelly and silverperch fingerlings were released into their new home in the Gil Weir, outside of Miles. Pic: Supplied

Miles Community rallies to boost fish numbers at the Weir

More than 10,000 yellowbelly and silverperch fingerlings were released into their new home in the Gil Weir, outside of Miles, by the Murilla Fish Stocking Club and Origin Energy.

COMMUNITY SPIRIT: 10k yellowbelly and silverperch fingerlings were released into their new home in the Gil Weir, outside of Miles. Pic: Supplied
COMMUNITY SPIRIT: 10k yellowbelly and silverperch fingerlings were released into their new home in the Gil Weir, outside of Miles. Pic: Supplied

The new local inhabitants will help boost natural fish numbers, and add to the 550,000 cod, silverperch and yellowbelly fingerlings, which have been routinely released by the club since 1995.

Murilla Fish Stocking Club secretary Ann Ross said club members had worked hard to fundraise and restock the waterways, with the goal of ensuring the legacy of local fishing long into the future.

“As our late, larger than life, Vice President Les Lucas used to say, ‘we put them in so you can take them out’,” she said.

HELPING HANDS: Club members, Origin volunteers, and community members had a great day releasing the fish into the Weir, followed by a BBQ and meet and greet session. Pic: Supplied
HELPING HANDS: Club members, Origin volunteers, and community members had a great day releasing the fish into the Weir, followed by a BBQ and meet and greet session. Pic: Supplied

Chinchilla local and Origin Land Access team member Kristelle Townsend tagged along with her family to assist in the release of the precious fish.

“My son Cooper really enjoyed the experience,” she said.

“He loves fishing with his Dad, so it was good for him to see the fingerlings and for us to know we helped replenish fish numbers in our waterways for conservation and our fishing adventures in the future.

“Hopefully a lot of those released will survive.”

Little Cooper said he had a great day at the Weir and is excited to go fishing with his dad.

“They were very small, but soon they will be big, so I hope I can catch one,” Cooper said.

COMMUNITY SPIRIT: 10k yellowbelly and silverperch fingerlings being set free at the Weir. Pic: Supplied
COMMUNITY SPIRIT: 10k yellowbelly and silverperch fingerlings being set free at the Weir. Pic: Supplied

Not only will the fingerlings help play an important role in the conservation of freshwater

fish ecosystems, but they are contributing to recreational fishing by giving a drought affected system a top-up for keen anglers in the future.

The fingerlings were grown and supplied by Hanwood Fish Hatchery in Murgon, which is one of the largest freshwater fish hatcheries in Queensland.

If you’d like to know more about the fishing club in Miles, contact Ann Ross on 0427 276

243 or email murillafishstocking@gmail.com.



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