A message for workers who haven't been locked out of Glencore's Oaky North Mine.
A message for workers who haven't been locked out of Glencore's Oaky North Mine. Campbell Gellie

Blame accusations for threats to rape children at CQ mine

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull says Labor leader Bill Shorten should condemn the 'thuggery' of some CFMEU members.

"Shorten should condemn this CFMEU thuggery and abuse and the ALP should stop taking its money," he tweeted on Wednesday.

It comes amid reports CFMEU members picketing the Oaky Creek North mine near Moranbah are under investigation for reported threats and intimidation towards security and non-striking workers.

Union head Ged Kearney has also claimed it is mining giant Glencore's fault that CFMEU protesters are making threats, as it has emerged a young girl has been labelled a "f**king whore" on social media because her family has refused to strike.

While the ACTU president said she did not condone sickening behaviour, she slapped down questions over whether the CFMEU had a culture problem.

"We wouldn't be in this situation if it wasn't for Glencore's behaviour,'' Ms Kearney said, who also suggested some protesters may not be members of the CFMEU.

Mine owner Glencore locked out approximately 190 workers from the mine earlier this year after the CFMEU launched industrial action.

Protesters have been picketing the mine for more than three months.

The union has accused Glencore of trying to strip workers of basic rights and increasing housing costs. Weekly rent for a three-four bedroom house at Tieri will rise from $15.50 to $30 a week.

"Motel-type" accommodation, which includes meals, will increase to $48 a week, compared to $24. Most workers earn between $160,000-$180,000 a year.

Mr Shorten said he did not condone the 'disrespectful behaviour' of some CFMEU members.

"I also do not condone a multinational mining company locking out its Queensland workforce unless they accept a cut to their pay and conditions."

 

Some of what was said by CFMEU protesters.
Some of what was said by CFMEU protesters.

Labor frontbencher Murray Watts denied there was a cultural problem in the CFMEU.

"There's absolutely no place for that kind of behaviour and language," he told Sky News.

"However, I don't think it's fair to blame a union or its leadership for the actions of individuals protesting and using inappropriate behaviour."

The CFMEU released a statement that said the allegations were being "used as a distraction from the real battle to save Aussie jobs".

But it did not condone offensive behaviour and had issued guidelines to protesting members.



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