FLOOD FILE: Flood waters are expected to lead to a significant increase in mosquito numbers in coming weeks. Photo from the 2008 floods reveals flood waters inundating Depot Hill properties.
FLOOD FILE: Flood waters are expected to lead to a significant increase in mosquito numbers in coming weeks. Photo from the 2008 floods reveals flood waters inundating Depot Hill properties.

Disgusting creatures descend on Rockhampton

THEY'RE said to be the world's deadliest animals, and they have already swarmed Rockhampton.

As flood waters rise, so do the number of aggressive breeding mosquitoes which rely on water to complete their life cycle.

You may have already started feeling the wrath of the wet-weather side effect following heavy rain last week, but Rockhampton Region councillor Neil Fisher warns the worst is yet to come.

The Airport, Water and Waste committee chairman advises in Queensland, viral diseases such as Dengue fever, Barmah Forest virus and Ross River virus are all transmitted by mosquitoes.

MOZZIE DANGERS: The break down on mosquito-borne diseases

Though the RRC have an ongoing mosquito misting program, Cr Fisher says it is vital the community play their part in reporting sites with increased mozzie activity.

He notes backyards could be harbour sites for the breeding mosquitoes, and danger spots include water in saucers or trays under pot plants, self-watering pots, bowls, basins or any other container for holding water.

Discarded tyres, birdbaths and even some varieties of bromeliads which allow water retention are on the risk list.

"Just think, a female mosquito can lay up to 200 eggs at a time, which can last more than five years," he stated in his latest Gardening column.

"While most remain within a short distance of their breeding grounds, mosquitoes can travel large distances to other areas depending on weather conditions."

Mosquitoes are most prevalent at dawn or dusk, as they shelter in grass or other vegetation during the heat of the day.

The World Health Organisation advise mosquito-borne diseases cause millions of deaths each year, with 438,000 deaths due to malaria alone in 2015.

The Rockhampton Regional Council offer this mosquito advice:

  • Use spray repellent that contains DEET;
  • Wear light coloured clothing (dark colours attract them);
  • Keep window and door screens closed;
  • Use mosquito coils or citronella candles;
  • Empty out stagnant water from your yard eg. in wheelbarrows, pots.

Contact the Rockhampton Regional Council's customer service, or your divisional councillor to notify them of mosquito populations.

Ongoing rain can hamper the misting program.



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