IN COURT: Beth Houston pleaded guilty in Bundaberg Magistrates Court to dangerous operation of a vehicle and failing to provide a specimen of blood after a crash in October last year.
IN COURT: Beth Houston pleaded guilty in Bundaberg Magistrates Court to dangerous operation of a vehicle and failing to provide a specimen of blood after a crash in October last year.

Moving day gone wrong: Woman in court over crash

A WOMAN has been told she made a "foolish" decision by a magistrate after she crashed her overloaded car into another vehicle near the Hummock.

Beth Houston, 33, pleaded guilty in Bundaberg Magistrates Court to one count of dangerous operation of a vehicle and failing to provide a specimen of blood for analysis.

Police prosecutor Sergeant Dean Burgess told the court emergency services were called to a crash at the intersection of Hummock and Windermere Rd just before 10am on October 26 last year.

Sgt Burgess said when police arrived at the scene they saw a dual-cab Mitsubishi Triton on its side and a Toyota Rav, driven by Houston, sitting on a large rock in a garden bed.

He said all people were out of their vehicles on police arrival.

The court heard a witness, who was in their front yard, saw Houston driving down the Hummock Rd and estimated her to be travelling at 80km/h.

Sgt Burgess said when the witness realised Houston was not going to stop they moved out of the way and saw the Rav roll twice.

Sgt Burgess said everyone involved in the crash was breath tested at the scene and returned readings of zero.

Houston was taken to Bundaberg Hospital where she later refused to give a blood sample for analysis.

Houston's barrister Craig Ryan told the court at the time of the crash his client was in the middle of moving back to the region.

Mr Ryan said Houston had a car load of items she had picked up from her mum's place and she felt the car was not stopping properly.

He said she put the cause of the crash down to being distracted by the car load.

Mr Ryan said Houston returned a zero breath analysis reading and was extremely distressed at the scene.

He submitted to the court Houston would benefit from a period of probation so she could get help with her mental health issues.

Magistrate Terry Duroux took into account Houston's plea of guilty and that it came at an early opportunity.

Mr Duroux said Houston made a "foolish" choice to drive her car when it was overloaded and said she should have stopped and asked her mother for help.

He said that people don't get to choose whether or not they follow the directions of police.

Mr Duroux also took into account Houston had been without her licence since the crash in October.

Houston was ordered to complete nine months of probation and was disqualified from holding a licence for six months.

A conviction was not recorded for the dangerous operation offence, but was recorded for failing to provide a specimen of breath.



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