Makhala Swinson at Carinity Wahroonga. Photo Allan Reinikka / The Morning Bulletin
Makhala Swinson at Carinity Wahroonga. Photo Allan Reinikka / The Morning Bulletin Allan Reinikka

‘My parents were stressing out ... they were scared’

BEFORE she went to Carinity Wahroonga, Rockhampton's Makhala Swinson felt like the strange kid no one wanted to talk to.

But for more than a year she said the counsellors at Wahroonga gave her hope and direction. Now, she can't believe others in the same position won't have access to similar help.

"When you don't have that support, it's a really scary thing to deal with," Makhala said.

"When you're fighting with yourself, it's not usually an argument that ends well."

Makhala said before she was referred to the service by her school counsellor, she didn't want to tell anyone how she was feeling.

She said her parents thought her withdrawal from society was typical teen behaviour.

Having the Carinity Wahroonga counsellor to talk to, gave Makhala ways to broach the difficult subject of depression and anxiety with her parents.

Makhala's parents were also invited in to talk with her and the centre's counsellors.

"My parents were stressing out ... they were scared too," she said.

"They didn't know what was going to happen, they didn't know if they were going to wake up to me no longer here.

"The fact that Wahroonga was chatting to my parents as well meant it was giving them some support."



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