Opinion

MY SAY: Marijuana green light good, but just a start

GROWING: Medicinal cannabis growing at a US facility.
GROWING: Medicinal cannabis growing at a US facility. Nathan Denette

THE passing of legislation of medicinal cannabis treatments in State Parliament was a significant step forward for those suffering inconceivable pain.

It was a bi-partisan, common-sense approach to legislating what some would argue should be a basic human right.

The right to explore any option to ease pain and suffering of health conditions.

The Public Health (Medicinal Cannabis) Bill 2016 passed unanimously last week, enabling oncologists, paediatric neurologists and palliative care specialists to prescribe medicinal cannabis.

That legislation won't be enacted until March next year though, much to the vexation of long-time medical marijuana campaigners.

Despite the progress, there are still calls to have an amnesty on all cannabis therapy users, their carers and cannabis therapists to allow access to whole-plant products.

Whole-plant cannabis oil is one treatment that is proving popular and successful at treating the symptoms of epilepsy and other debilitating conditions.

A number of parents and medicinal cannabis advocates spoke last week of the challenges they still face and that the legislation, while a positive, was not far-reaching enough to benefit all sufferers.

Under the recently-passed legislation other doctors, GPs included, would be able to seek permission from Queensland Health to prescribe medicinal cannabis products to patients with certain conditions.

Dispensation can also be sought in the interim by patients looking to access medicinal cannabis before the laws are introduced in March, 2017.

Using cannabis products to treat people without these permissions or prescriptions would remain illegal.

And that is where the problem lies for many families.

With many of the cannabis products to be imported from overseas for prescriptions under this legislation, many parents are seeking the okay to use locally-grown, whole-plant products.

They want to know the product they are using is natural, chemical-free and Australian-made.

So surely it's imperative we identify sites and begin production of a local supply of cannabis immediately?

To take a step in the right direction is great, but why not break into a sprint towards a better outcome?

A local supply would ideally lower the cost of the treatments if they were not to be included on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and in doing so create a whole new industry, preferably in our region.

The legislation has to be applauded and so to the efforts of the campaigners and Buderim MP Steve Dickson who beat the drum long and loud on this issue.

But there is more to be done to help these people.

Topics:  medical cannabis my say opinion politics state government sunshine coast



How to survive a bushfire in your car

IT SOUNDS like a nightmare, but it can happen.

Eight reasons to join the RFS

SPREAD across 93% of Queensland, the Rural Fire Service has about 36,000 volunteers. And you could be one of them.

What if my insurer gives me grief?

CLAIMING your insurance cover after a natural disaster can go one of two ways. It can be a breeze, or like pulling teeth.

The heatwave is here to stay

Generic hot weather photo.

Summer has arrived with a vengeance

Worries for Livingstone rate payers as Shoalwater expands

Bill Ludwig is concerned for Livingstone rate payers

Mayor Ludwig voices concerns over no rates for Shoalwater

VIDEO: Colorado lifts the standard of today's tough work horse

Introducing the all new Holden Colorado Z71, exclusive to Lawrence's Holden.

Beasty dual cab locks in ruggedess and refinement

Local Partners

The heatwave is here to stay

Summer has arrived with a vengeance and there's no sign of it stopping any time soon


ACROSS THE REGION

CHRISTMAS SONGS: It's Carols by Candlelight in Emu Park this weekend.

LOOKING for something to do this weekend?

72 HOURS ACROSS THE REGION

Rock Force at the Great Western Hotel tonight. Performing all your favourite covers from all your favourite bands.

LOOKING for something to do this weekend?

New book to document history of Livingstone Shire

St Faiths School, Yeppoon.

Book includes previously unseen photographs of historical sites

David Attenborough on facing his mortality

Sir David Attenborough in a scene from the TV special The Death of the Oceans.

Life without Sir David Attenborough is hard to imagine

Goooodbye Hamish and Andy (from our radios)

Hamish and Andy

The pair have been on air since 2006

Saying "I do" changed Shia's outlook on marriage

Shia LaBeouf has a new outlook on marriage since he tied the knot.

Singer tunes in to first movie role

Tori Kelly voices the character Meena in the movie Sing.

Musician Tori Kelly voices Meena the teenage elephant in Sing

Cricketing greats bring Aussie mateship to commentary box

Cricket commentator Adam Gilchrist.

ADAM Gilchrist enjoys the fun of calling the Big Bash League.

The dead help solve the case

Debut novel delivers on wit, violence and shock

Chinese locked out of Australian property market

The rules are different if you're a foreigner

The buyer was from China - the trouble started right there

Morrison signs off on new affordable rental model

Australia's Treasurer Scott Morrison speaks during a press conference after a meeting of the Council of Federal Financial Relations at Parliament House in Canberra, Friday, Dec. 2, 2016.

Scott Morrison signed off on development of a new financing model

Coast high-flyer's fight back from bankruptcy, $72m debt

Scott Juniper went from millionaire developer to declaring bankruptcy in2012, now he is back on top of his game again with new developments including this one in Coolum.

'Apocalyptic lending storm' causes financial collapse.

Ready to SELL your property?

Post Your Ad Here!