GROWTH SPOT: The Nicklin Way is earmarked for infill development along a mass transit system corridor.
GROWTH SPOT: The Nicklin Way is earmarked for infill development along a mass transit system corridor.

Nicklin Way set for urban boom, but council can't talk size

COUNCIL can't say how many people it hopes to accommodate along a potential light rail corridor, or what heights it may increase building limits to, despite wanting to have the first stage of a mass transit system operating by 2026.

The Coast's population is set to swell by 200,000 people by 2041, and the Nicklin Way has been earmarked in council's strategic business case for a mass transit system for infill development, as part of significant urban consolidation.

A council spokeswoman said preferred land uses, densities and building heights along the mass transit system corridor "have not yet been considered by council".

READ: Mass transit system plan to spark rapid infill development

The spokeswoman said it was too early to speculate about specific planning amendments, but "it is clear that the project will present opportunities for consolidation in the corridor".

"These matters will be considered as part of ongoing investigations for the mass transit project," she said.

Artist's impression of the proposed light rail system on the Coast- Nicklin Way view.
Artist's impression of the proposed light rail system on the Coast- Nicklin Way view. Megan Mackander

The spokeswoman was unable to say how many of the 200,000 new residents were hoped to be accommodated along the mass transit corridor, and specifically, how many via infill development along the Nicklin Way.

She said the State Government's SEQ Regional Plan had a target of 62 per cent of new development being consolidation within the existing urban footprint, and a high-quality integrated public transport system was key to reducing car dependency and supporting urban consolidation to reduce possible urban sprawl.

Kawana Chamber of Commerce vice president Brendon Murray said Nicklin Way was an obvious choice for higher density residential development.

Brendon Murray of Bentley's Accountants, and Kawana Chamber of Commerce vice president, left.
Brendon Murray of Bentley's Accountants, and Kawana Chamber of Commerce vice president, left. Erle Levey

He said it was a "main commercial thoroughfare" and he expected part of the area's natural progression would involve heavier industry shifting out to industrial estates, making way for redevelopment for residential and business uses.

Mr Murray said the mass transit corridor set to run along the Nicklin Way meant it made sense to bolster densities in residential hubs along the corridor, and residents had to accept higher densities as part of the growth dictated for the region by the State Government.

"We could go higher (residential building heights) there (Nicklin Way), along that strip, without ruining some of the natural beauty right on the coastline," he said.



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