Notorious QLD paedophile victim now struggles with PTS

A VICTIM of notorious paedophile Kevin Lynch is only now, 35 years later, struggling with post traumatic issues from the historical abuse.

The victim's issues resulted in him pleading guilty in Rockhampton Magistrates Court on October 31 to four counts of breaching domestic violences orders naming his parents, who are in their 80s.

The man's lawyer Matthew Messenger said his client had given evidence during a commission into Lynch's offending at Brisbane Grammar School but it was only recently that he has suffered problems from it, which includes the behaviour towards his parents.

Lynch was a counsellor at Brisbane Grammar School from 1973 to 1988 and sexually abused dozens of boys.

The court heard the man turned up at his parent's home at The Range at 1am on August 18, breaching a domestic violence order.

He asked for two slices of bread.

Mr Messenger said his client had spent five hours at the police station prior to going to his parents' place, had been made homeless as a result of the order which included not going to his parents' place, and had not eaten in three days.

He said his client was an insulin-dependant diabetic.

The court heard the defendant asked his father when he was going to die and when the father responded soon, the defendant replied "good, I don't want to see you again".

Mr Messenger said his client had been told by a family friend his father had terminal cancer - he had not been told prior to this incident.

He said his client had animosity towards his parents who had believed the school's story back when the defendant was a child and complained to his parents about the child sex abuse.

Mr Messenger said the school told his clients parents their son did not want to go to school because he was upset about not getting a spot on a sports team.

The court heard the man breached the domestic violence order three more times by calling his parents' house.

Mr Messenger said his client had missed calls from that number and assumed his sisters were trying to contact him about his belongings, which were still at the house.

He said one of the calls he made was after a courier had delivered his belongings, but there were items missing.

The court heard the man, who has hearing and vision problems, accused his parents of stealing the missing items, or selling them, and demanded their return or cash restitution.

This was left in a voicemail message on the home phone.

During one call, he demanded he be met outside a Foodworks store for the handover of $500.

Police prosecutor Shayne Studdert said the meeting took place on October 8 at 2.20pm with the victim rolling down the window just enough to pass the cash through, and a witness exited the vehicle to give the defendant his property.

He said the man then abused the victim and the witness, calling them vulgar names.

The man was fined $750 and convictions were recorded.



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