Hurricane Irma tracks over Saint Martin and the Leeward Islands, along a path towards Puerto Rico, Cuba and Hispaniola and a possible direct hit on densely populated South Florida.
Hurricane Irma tracks over Saint Martin and the Leeward Islands, along a path towards Puerto Rico, Cuba and Hispaniola and a possible direct hit on densely populated South Florida.

Private islands, billionaires in the path

SOME of the richest, most famous and powerful people in the world have palatial homes and even whole islands in the path of devastating Hurricane Irma.

Caribbean mansions owned by Johnny Depp, Keith Richards, Oprah Winfrey and American President Donald Trump could have been ravaged by the most powerful Atlantic Ocean storm ever recorded.

Sir Richard Branson refused to leave his private Necker Island in the British Virgin Islands and said he would be hiding in his wine cellar when Hurricane Irma hit the luxury hideaway.

The Brit billionaire decided to ride out the storm and was pictured playing dice with members of his staff.

Hollywood stars Johnny Depp and Eddie Murphy and magician David Copperfield own islands in the Bahamas.

Oprah Winfrey is believed to have an opulent home in Antigua.

Die Hard star Bruce Willis and Rolling Stones legend Keith Richards have substantial mansions in exclusive Parrot Cay in Turks and Caicos.

Mr Trump's 2ha Chateau des Palmiers estate on the French Island of St Martin and Chelsea Football Club owner Roman Abramovich's $64million mansion in St Barts also faced destruction.

Thousands of tourists have been advised to evacuate the holiday islands and Florida.

- The Sun



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