OLDER high-rise buildings would be affected by a proposed new law to allow sale for redevelopment without the unanimous support of owners.
OLDER high-rise buildings would be affected by a proposed new law to allow sale for redevelopment without the unanimous support of owners. John McCutcheon

Proposed new law may cost people their home

A REVIEW of property law in Queensland will consider introducing NSW-style legislation that now allows people's homes to be sold from underneath them.

Queenslanders have until May 7 to make submissions to the Government Property Law Review, prepared by the Queensland University of Technology, whose 29 recommendations include reducing from 100% the majority needed to sell an ageing residential building for redevelopment.

Attorney-General and Minister for Justice Yvette D'Ath said before considering any changes to the current laws, the Palaszczuk Government wanted to hear people's views.

"Some stakeholders have expressed concern that the current thresholds and processes for terminating community titles schemes are too onerous," she said.

Caloundra-based body corporate manager Peter Bryant, who manages properties in NSW and Queensland, said the proposal bowed to will of developers at the expense of often elderly, vulnerable people.

"If people want to stay in their homes they should be allowed to," he said.

"It should remain unchanged. The proposal to allow a 75% vote is unfair.

"It is really the aged population (living in units) who would be affected the most."

Mr Bryant said often there was no other source of income, they would have difficulty buying for less than they sold and the aged were not in a position to take a fresh mortgage.

He said the current unit building boom in Sydney was delivering product that used inferior materials and with no thought by planners to the long-term impacts on residents.

Mr Bryant said a lot of developments were being done by companies that liquidated the moment a building was completed, leaving no-one to sue.

He said states and councils were bending over backwards to develop-at-any-cost policies driven by promises of job creation numbers that rarely eventuated.

Mrs D'Ath said the community could provide feedback on the report's findings and recommendations, and on the costs and benefits of the recommendations.

"These include improving the ability of bodies corporate to make and enforce by-laws dealing with vehicle towing, pets and second-hand cigarette smoke drift between units," she said.

"The report also recommends changes to improve the ability of bodies corporate to recover unpaid body corporate contributions from lot owners."



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