Gerald Victor hands over the big spanner at Murphy Motors to Alex White, who will take over the business in February.
Gerald Victor hands over the big spanner at Murphy Motors to Alex White, who will take over the business in February. Sharyn O'Neill

Ready for the spoils of retirement

GERALD Victor has a list of things to do in retirement that's almost as big as the spanner he's used for years to promote his business, Murphy Motors.

Running again for City Hall, though, definitely isn't one of the things on the to-do list.

The 66-year-old, who ran for mayor at the last council election, yesterday announced he will pass the spanner on at Murphy Motors, the company he has run for the past 30 years, to Alex White, who will take over in February.

"It's time to move on," Gerald said.

"I think I have served my duty to the trade, having trained dozens of male and female apprentices during the past 30 years.

"Nothing is forever."

Future plans include continuing to learn to fly and buying a plane, plenty of voluntary charity work, working as a marriage celebrant and refereeing boxing matches.

"I'd also love to join a choir," said Gerald, who earlier this year was awarded the Order of Australia medal.

He said life as a mechanic had changed a lot during the past 30 years.

"Once upon a time you used to chase a problem and repair it, now it's chase and replace," Gerald said.

"There is a greater deal of accountability these days, which is a good thing.

"Technology has changed the automobile industry and we are seeing vehicles now not worth repairing because you can buy new ones so cheaply."

He said this trend would continue as the Chinese and Indian markets produced ever cheaper vehicles.

While he has enjoyed his working life, Gerald said he had one regret - not going to university to become an engineer.

"I grew up in a different era when you didn't go to university unless you were rich or smart," he said,

"Today the kids get so much help, there is no excuse for not bettering yourself.

"And if you want to learn a trade you can earn really good money."

Alex, who has been at Murphy Motors for about three years and who has spent much of his working life in the trucking industry, said he planned to focus on delivering a quality service for the Rockhampton area.

 

Boom time

Not so long ago, retirement meant giving up work to enjoy the fruits of a long working life, but new research shows two-thirds (66%) of Central Queensland baby boomers plan to continue to work into the traditional years of retirement.

A recent Suncorp Life survey of residents in Central Queensland aged 50 to 65 found of those who intended to continue working after the age of 65, 39% expected to work 10 to 19 hours a week and 23% expected to work 20 to 29 hours.

Suncorp Life executive general manager David Carter said the number of grey-collar workers had been increasing year on year for some time.

"The baby boomer generation is redefining what it means to be retired," Mr Carter said.

He said while some turning 65 had a choice about whether to remain employed, others didn't have an option.



CQ RESCUE: Car goes off road, stuck in floodwater

CQ RESCUE: Car goes off road, stuck in floodwater

Reports at 3.34am said car was in water to the bottom of the car.

London-based sister signed Campbell Family Trust papers

London-based sister signed Campbell Family Trust papers

Deceased man's property signed over to Campbell Family Trust

Local Partners