Rescuers’ hands tied as hundreds of roos slowly die

 

RESCUERS claim hundreds of kangaroos spent up to 12 days dying on burnt-out areas of Bribie Island because a state government agency would not allow access to the area.

Wildlife Rescue Queensland claims to have put down 15 kangaroos and wallabies, found hundreds more deceased, and transported four orphaned joeys to the mainland in the past two days.

Rescuers have resorted to going into the fire zone without permission, alleging they have been kept out by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service for almost two weeks and unable to ease the pain of the animals which spent 10 to 12 days dying.

Wildlife Queensland president Byron Cann said: "We certainly feel that we could've alleviated the suffering of some of the animals we found deceased.

"God knows how long they waited before they finally succumbed to their injuries.

"We could've alleviated things much sooner."

The organisation has been caring for native Australian wildlife in the Moreton Bay region since 2007 and supports Australia Zoo and the RSPCA to place sick, injured or orphaned native wildlife with trained carers.

'Lucky' the eight-month-old eastern grey joey, was found orphaned, suffering severe shock and minor burns as a result of a controlled burn on Bribie Island that jumped containment lines. Picture: Lachie Millard
'Lucky' the eight-month-old eastern grey joey, was found orphaned, suffering severe shock and minor burns as a result of a controlled burn on Bribie Island that jumped containment lines. Picture: Lachie Millard

Mr Cann said the lack of access given to wildlife carers by the Department of Environment and Science was disappointing.

"They wouldn't even let us come and check from the shore," he said.

Among the orphaned joeys the group is caring for is Lucky, an eight-month-old eastern grey kangaroo that was treated after being found suffering severe shock and minor burns.

A spokeswoman for the DES, which runs Parks and Wildlife, said native animal deaths were an unfortunate consequence of bushfires.

"The deceased animals are being removed and DES will conduct an assessment of the impact to protected areas and native species," the spokeswoman said.

"If crews locate any injured wildlife, they will arrange for care by a veterinarian or wildlife carer."



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