William Nowland isone of several German St residents concerned about traffic on the road, saying it's often difficult to safety reverse from his own driveway.
William Nowland isone of several German St residents concerned about traffic on the road, saying it's often difficult to safety reverse from his own driveway. Michelle Gately

Residents want change 'before someone is killed'

THE sound of tyres screeching and yet another crash near-miss often has William Nowland's blood running cold as he sits in his lounge room.

His biggest fear is that one day, his house will be the place where an out of control car comes to rest.

William is one of several German St residents concerned about traffic on the road, which has become increasingly busy as housing developments in the area increase and First Turkey Mountain Bike Reserve becomes a popular attraction.

In 2015, Rockhampton Regional Council took action after a petition from residents regarding drivers speeding and cutting the corner between Rosewood Dr and Permien St.

Council re-marked pavement lines throughout the curve, installed raised pavement markers.

But it seems little has changed.

"We've seen quite a few crashes and we hold our breath every time there is a crash,” William said.

"There's been a lot of crashes.

"Luckily for us, they never come across the road and hit here.

"One hit the garage next door, one hit a truck that was parked on the side of the road that was parked next door.”

Reversing from driveways can prove a challenge and William said his ute had been hit once as a car cut the corner.

The issue was raised during council's infrastructure committee meeting on Tuesday, where a report showed the community felt more needed to be done.

One resident wrote in a council survey that change was needed "before someone is killed”, while another said motorists continued to show "total disregard for line marking”.

Another resident said they hoped council "could find it within their budget to place speed bumps on the corner” to slow drivers and deter them cutting the corner.

William agreed a "damn good bump” was needed for drivers to change their ways.

"Signs are for people that are taking notice of what they're doing,” he said.

"Many, many times we've heard near-misses and screeches coming around the corner.

"You sit in here and just go cold thinking what could have happened and waiting for the bang.”

On Tuesday, council resolved to implement chevron line markings with raised rumble pavement markers, as well as extending the footpath around the curve to reduce risk to pedestrians.

It's expected to cost a total of $12,000.

Council will continue to consult with residents and evaluate the effectiveness of the new line markings.



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